The Hedda Award

Best direction

Winners
  • Sigrid Strøm Reibo

    "Some of our young directors have been educated at home, others have brought exciting new impulses from abroad. Together they have given Norwegian theatre a pleasurable lift the past 15 years. So has this year's winner, who has proven a particular ability to make a text contemporary through purposefully searching for its real message, for so to create a convincing totality through uniting light, sound, physical expressivity and dance with intimate, confident person instruction. The award goes to a splendid, entertaining reinterpretation of Black Rider at Hålogaland Theatre, and a thorough and very successful new version of Molière's The Misanthrope at Rogaland Theatre.

    The Hedda award for best direction goes to Sigrid Strøm Reibo."

Nominated
  • Sigrid Strøm Reibo

    Sigrid Strøm Reibo for the direction of The Misanthrope by Jean-Baptiste Molière, Rogaland Theatre, and the direction of Black Rider, Hålogaland Theatre:

    Sigrid Strøm Reibo was born in Tromsø in 1982. She started her directorial education in Lithuania, and next took her bachelor's degree in acting at GITIS Scandinavia in Aarhus. In 2006 she started studying for her master's degree in stage direction at GITIS Moscow, and in 2009 she directed the production The Cat That Walked by Himself (Kipling), by Russian critics named the best production for families in Moscow that year. She made her debut in Norway in 2010 with Waiting for Godot at Hålogaland Theatre, for which she was nominated for the Hedda Award in the category of best direction. Next she staged the musical Stone Age comedy Tøffe Taffy Huleboer (literally: Tough Taffy Cave Dweller, based on Kipling's short story How the first letter was written) at Brageteatret, and Haugtussa* (The Hulder) at Rogaland Theatre. This year she has also made her debut as an opera director: She staged La Bohème for The Norwegian Arctic Opera.

  • Terje Strømdahl

    Terje Strømdahl for the direction of Orphans by Dennis Kelly, The National Theatre at Torshov:

    Terje Strømdahl, born in 1952, was educated at The National Academy of Theatre(1979-1982). He started his acting career at Trøndelag Theatre. In 1984–85 he worked for Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre), and from 1989 at The National Theatre, the first three years as a member of the Torshov company. In 1989/1990 he received The Norwegian Critics'Award in the category for theatre for his interpretation of the main characters in The Hour of the Lynx by P. O. Enquist and A Place with the Pigs by Athol Fugard, and in 2001 The Hedda Award for the role of Salieri in Amadeus by Peter Schaffer. He has taken part in a number of movies and TV productions, and today he is an actor, pedagogue at Oslo National Academy of the Arts, and a director. The past two years he has, among other things, directed Babette's Feastat The National Theatre (2010) and Mistero Buffo at Trøndelag Theatre (2011).

  • Eirik Stubø

    Eirik Stubø for the direction of Mourning Becomes Electra by Eugene O'Neill The Norwegian Theatre:

    Eirik Stubø, born in 1965, was educated as a director at The National Academy of Theatre, graduating in1995. In 1997 he became artistic director of Rogaland Theatre, and in 2000 he became responsible for The National Theatre, for two terms, until 2009. After 2009 he has directed a number of productions internationally as well as in Norway. In 2003 his Vinterforvaring* (Winter Storage) got the Oslo Award given out by the magazine Natt og Dag for best theatre production, The Wild Duck received New York Magazine's Cultural Award 2006 and was selected among New York's ten best productions in 2006, and in May 2007 Eirik Stubø was awarded the Obie Award for best direction for the same production. In 2009 he got the Hedda Award for best direction for his interpretation of Rosmersholm at The National Theatre, and The Norwegian Critics' Award in 2008/2009 for Rosmersholm and Andromache.

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

Best leading actor

Winners
  • Mattis Herman Nyquist

    "Not many years have passed since this year's winner started his acting career, but he has already made his mark at four different theatres, and he has gotten a Hedda nomination. The role for which he gets the award today is not an easy one. A complex character, filled with contradictions, with comical as well as tragic sides, self-centred and self-righteous, but also justly critical towards a corrupt, superficial society.

    He gets the award for his intelligent approach towards a demanding text, even in alexandrines, creating a nuanced, at the same time modern and classic character of Molière's misanthropic Alceste at Rogaland Theatre.

    The best leading actor award goes to Mattis Herman Nyquist."

Nominated
  • Stig Amdam

    Stig Amdam for the role of Mikkel Borgen in The Word, directed by Ola B. Johannessen, and for the role of Henry Law in When the rain stops falling, directed by Svein Sturla Hungnes, both at The National Stage:

    Stig Amdam was born in 1961, and graduated from The National Academy of Theatrein 1983. He played a couple of roles at The National Theatre the autumn of 1983, but in 1984 he became employed by The Norwegian Theatre where he made his mark with his interpretation of Harold Pinter's The Birthday Party. In 1989 he came to The National Stage. He has been there since, and interpreted playwrights as different as Shakespeare, Lars Norén, Henrik Ibsen, Sam Shepard, Yasmina Reza and Molière. He is also a playwright and director, and debuted as such with Hundedagar* (Dog Days) at Teatret Vårt (Our Theatre) in Molde. He personally directed Simon's Story staged at Hordaland Theatre, and in 2010 he was Norway's candidate for The Nordic Drama Award. His radio play Hawk and Dove won silver in Prix Italia in 2008.

  • Thorbjørn Harr

    Thorbjørn Harr for the role of Leon in Orphans, directed by Terje Strømdahl, National at Torshov:

    Thorbjørn Harr was born in 1974, and was "discovered in the school yard" when Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation was searching for actors for youth series. He studied at The National Academy of Theatre(1997 - 2000), after which he started working for The National Theatre, where he has been since, interpreting roles as different as Figaro in The Marriage of Figaro, Tom in The Glass Menagerie, and Tommy in Pippi Longstocking. He also has taken part in several Jo Strømgren productions, including the movie Destination Moscow for which he was nominated for the Amanda Award for best leading actor. I 2005 he got the honorary award of Per Aabel, and in 2009/2010 he received The Norwegian Critics' Award in the category for theatre for his effort in Chet Baker spiller ikke her* (Chet Baker doesn't play here)by Lars Saabye Christiansen, which he directed with Sofia Jupither, and for which he also got the NRK radio theatre award Blå fugl (literally: Blue Bird).

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

  • Mattis Herman Nyquist

    Mattis Herman Nyquist for the role of Alceste in The Misanthrope, directed by Sigrid Strøm Reibo, Rogaland Theatre:

    Mattis Herman Nyquist was born in 1982. He attended The non-degree granting college of RomerikeandWesterdals School of Communication before he in2005 was accepted by the acting academy at Oslo National Academy of the Arts (formerly The National Academy of Theatre). He graduated in 2008, and made his debut at The Norwegian Theatre the same year. He had parts in The Castle and Dying for It. In 2009 he acted his first part at The National Theatre, and the spring of 2010 at The Norwegian Touring Theatre he was Ask Burlefot in The Song of the Red Ruby, dramatised and directed by Morten Borgersen, and an interpretation for which he was nominated for The Hedda Awards. At The National Theatre he played George Tesman in Peer Perez Øian's Hedda-nominated direction of Hedda Gabler in 2010, and he was also part of the Hedda-nominated ensemble of The National Theatre's Bankerått* (Bankrupt, deliberately misspelled - the real Norwegian spelling is bankerott).

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

Best leading actress

Winners
  • Ane Dahl Torp

    "This year's winner has during the past ten years interpreted highly diverse roles, serious, less serious, classic and modern. Outside of her regular theatre she has taken part in an unabashed farce, but also in a sombre documentary drama, and in addition she has found the time to become a prize-awarded movie actress. She gets the award for her nuanced, credible and thorough performance of a warm, naïve and goodhearted woman who in meeting with the harsh reality of life sees no other alternative than changing her gender. The award she gets for her excellent, convincing interpretation of Szechwan's good person Shen-Te, and her tough cousin Shui-Ta at The Norwegian Theatre.

    The best leading actress award goes to Ane Dahl Torp."

Nominated
  • Hildegunn Eggen

    Hildegunn Eggen for the role of Mrs. Alving in Ghosts, directed by Kjersti Haugen, Trøndelag Theatre:

    Hildegunn Eggen is born in 1953, and attended The National Academy of Theatrefrom 1978 to 1981. After graduating from the Academy, she was hired by The National Theatre, where she worked for three years (1981–1984). She returned home to Trøndelag, and starter working for Trøndelag Theatre in 1985. She is a versatile actress who has made her mark in comedies and musicals as well as classics and modern drama. She also has had movie roles, and she has recorded many audio books. As one of very few actors not based in Oslo she won the Norwegian Critics'Award in the category for theatre in 2001/2002 for her interpretation of the title role in Mother Courage. In 2001 she was awarded the culture prize of the county of Nord-Trøndelag, and for her participation in the Saint Olav Drama over years she got the Stiklestad Award in 2002.

  • Kirsti Stubø

    Kirsti Stubø for the role of Lavinia Mannon in Mourning Becomes Electra, directed by Eirik Stubø, The Norwegian Theatre:

    Kirsti Stubø, born in 1975, was educated at The National Academy of Theatre(1995–1998). She first spent two years at Rogaland Theatre where she, among other things, interpreted the role of Irina in Three sisters before she in 2001 became employed by The Norwegian Theatre, for which she has played, among other roles, Solveig in Peer Gynt, Cassandra in Orestes, Indra's daughter in A Dream Play and Hermione in Andromache, an interpretation she got The Hedda Award in the category of best supporting actress for in 2009. In 2010 and 2011 she has been working for Stockholm City Theatre where she has, among other things, interpreted the role of Electra in Orestes and the title role of Emilia Galotti. She also has taken parts in movies, and during the international film festival in Moscow in 2007 she got the prestigious Best Actress Award for her effort in the film Opium.

  • Ane Dahl Torp

    Ane Dahl Torp for the role of Shen Te in The Good Person of Szechwan, directed by Philip Tiedemann, The Norwegian Theatre:

    Ane Dahl Torp was born in 1975, and she was educated at The National Academy of Theatrefrom 1996 to 1999. The year she graduated she was hired by Teatret Vårt (Our Theatre), and there she played the title role of Hedda Gabler. Since 2002 she has been part of the ensemble of The Norwegian Theatre, playing, among other roles, Masha in The Seagull and Siss in The Ice Castle. She was part of the ensemble in Pains of Youth, collectively nominated for The Hedda Award in 2011. She is also known as one of our best movie actresses. In 2004 she got her first Amanda Award for her role in the TV series Black Money, white lies, and in 2006 for the role of Nina Skåtøy in Moland's film version of Comrade Pedersen. In 2004 she also got Folkets filmpris (The People's Film Award, a movie award given out by the newspaper VG, Sceneweb's comment), and in 2007 the national TV award Gullruten for her effort in Codename Hunter.

Best production for children and youth

Winners
  • The Wall

    "This year's winner is a sombre production about how conflicts and wars are rising around hindrances and walls between people and cultures. At the same time the performance is playful, using all the options of the theatre. The stage design triggers the imagination, and works as a visual counterpart to the varied, suggestive music, and both create an unusually beautiful and poetic universe. Young children, youth and adults can all enjoy something appealing to them in particular.

    The best production for children and youth award goes to The Wall at Hordaland Theatre."

Nominated
  • Urmakarens Hjarte* (The Heart of the Clockmaker)

    Urmakarens Hjarte* (The Heart of the Clockmaker), Sandsund/Lie
    Text by: Miriam Prestøy Lie. Directed by: Torkil Sandsund. Stage design/costume design/video set design/paper cuts: Dordi Strøm. Light design: Torkel Skjærven. Video: Amanda Steggell. Sound design: Trond Lossius, Mattias Arvastsson. Mask: Julie Carl, Dordi Strøm
    Onstage: Per Vidar Anfinsen, Laufey Elíasdóttir, Morten Espeland, Unni Løvlid and Irene Waage. Produced by the theatre company Sandsund/Lie in collaboration with Sogn og Fjordane Theatre, Rogaland Theatre and The Førde Festival.

    «... a fable in screaming contrast to all the indolent entertainment children and youth are overfed.» Vårt Land.
    «...(rare) it is to meet a text so sharp and brave, with imagination as its means of expression, taking hold of such a difficult topic as the relationship between mother and daughter.» Klassekampen

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning

  • The Wall

    The Wall, Hordaland Theatre
    The Wall has been developed by all the involved after an idea by Ljudmil Nikolov. Music by: Karoline Krüger. Lyrics: Tore Nysæther. Direction: Trond Birkedal. Stage design and costumes: Silje Sandodden Kise, Lysdesign: Arne Kambestad.
    Onstage: Ljudmil Nikolov, Karoline Krüger, Eline Sundal (cello), Are Ovesen (trumpet) and Jostein Stalheim (accordion).

    «The Wall is a successful production using the illusion and the theatre magic to show children parts of an adult world.», Aftenposten
    «A dramatic, tender, intense, poetic, quiet, beautiful and strong performance - entirely without words.», Barn i byen

  • Sound of Freedom

    Sound of Freedom, Amund Sjølie Sveen
    Concept/text/music/direction/performer: Amund Sjølie Sveen. The production is performed in English.
    International terror, Norwegian weapon industry and sound as a weapon make the backdrop for Amund Sjølie Sveens performance lecture/concert lecture Sound of Freedom.

  • Lord of the Flies

    Lord of the Flies, Rogaland Teater
    Text by: William Golding. Dramatised by: Nigel Williams. Dramatisation translated into the Norwegian by: Hilde Hagerup. Stage design and costume design: Rolf Alme.
    Onstage: Tord Falch, Anders Hauge Steinbakk, Henrik Fjellheim, Paal Herman Ims, Tor Arne Vikingstad, Joachim Haaland, Johannes Aamodt, Anders Nilsson and Øyvind Larsen Runestad

    «..,a scarily contemporary play picking away the very violence out of the novel Lord of the Flies and letting the «fly» itself buzz to provoke reflection on the character of violence», Rogalands Avis
    «...a fast-paced, physical and thought-provoking production about boys and violence», Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation

  • Roadkills

    Roadkills, Akershus Theatre
    Text by: Cecilie Løveid. Choreography: Un-Magritt Nordseth. Directed by: Jon Tombre. Stage design/costumes: Yngvar Julin.

    Dancers: Trond Andrè BTech Hansen/Marcus BboyAndreassen, Lars Jacob Holm and Hanna Mjåvatn

    «It is important to treat such a theme as mourning, also for children and youth, and it is important to do it in such a way we can manage to enter it at an emotional level, while relating to it, rather than drowning in emotion.», Barnebokkritikk

Best supporting actor

Winners
  • Torbjørn Eriksen

    "For almost a decade this year's winner has proven himself onstage, in Oslo and elsewhere. He excels in using an as instinctive as intellectual approach to the characters he plays. Hence he makes them into live, complex beings. He also has the ability to listen, and with it, surefire, exciting interaction between him and his fellow actors is created. He gets the award for his nuanced, moving interpretation of a young man who is split between hatred and love, vengeance and the deepest of guilt.

    The best supporting actor award goes to Torbjørn Eriksen for his interpretation of Orin Mannon in Mourning Becomes Electra at The Norwegian Theatre."

Nominated
  • Torbjørn Eriksen

    Torbjørn Eriksen for the role of Orin in Mourning Becomes Electra, directed by Eirik Stubø, The Norwegian Theatre:

    Torbjørn Eriksen was born in 1980, and was educated at The National Academy of Theatrewhere he studied from 2000 to 2003. He was connected to Rogaland Theatre from 2003 to 2005, where the plays he had roles in included Nicholas Nickleby, Death of a Salesman, and Jon Fosse's The Dead Dogs. In 2006 he came to The Norwegian Theatre, where he has taken part in classics such as Richard II, Richard III, The Learned Ladies and Andromache, but also in modern contemporary drama such as Turn Me on, Dammit, Down to Sun, and Shadow of a Boy. In 2010 he was Werther in The Sorrows of Young Werther, and he interpreted the title role of Hamlet with Anders T. Andersen as the director in Thaulowhullet outside of Tønsberg, when Ibsen Theatre andThesbiteatret (The Thesbi Theatre) collaborated in producing.

  • Øystein Martinsen

    Øystein Martinsen for the role of Philinte in The Misanthrope, directed by Sigrid Strøm Reibo, Rogaland Theatre:

    Øystein Martinsen started his career in the theatre and revue community in Tromsø, in companies such as Kabinetteatret, Revymafiaen and Påtryneteatret. Next he attended The National Academy of Theatre(2001-2004). The summer of 2004 he played the button moulder in Nordnorsk Scenekompani's production of Peer Gynt, and the autumn of 2004 he came to Rogaland Theatre, where he made his debut in Nicholas Nickleby. At Rogaland Theatre he has acted in The Bacchae by Euripides, Shakespeare's Richard III and Ibsen's John Gabriel Borkman, but also in Journey to the Christmas Star, in Harold Pinter's Betrayal, Arne Lygre's Man without purpose and Jon Fosse's The Child. And when Stavanger was a European Capital of Culture in 2008 he took part in one of the main projects, (U)naturlig, naturligvis//et automobilt landskap* ((Un)natural, naturally//an automobile landscape).

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

  • Robert Skjærstad

    Robert Skjærstad for the role of Lucky in Waiting for Godot, directed by Harald Hoaas, Teater Innlandet:

    Robert Skjærstad was born in 1966, and since 1990 he has worked as a freelance actor. He has been hired by The National Theatre, for which he during a ten-year period, from 1990 to 2000, took part in more than 15 different productions. He has also worked for Trøndelag Theatre, Teatret Vårt (Our Theatre), Sogn og Fjordane Theatre and Rogaland Theatre. He has long experience from independent theatre companies such as Verdensteatret, Passage Nord, Visjoner and The Theatre of Cruelty, which he has been connected to since 1996, and he has taken part in Captain Sabertooth in Kristiansand Zoo and Amusement Park. He is also very active as a movie actor, got the Amanda Award for best leading actor for his role in Pål Sletaune's Junk Mail, and he played a torpedo in the TV series Lilyhammer!

Best supporting actress

Winners
  • Gjertrud Jynge

    "This year's winner has for many years impressed with performances in smaller, larger and medium-sized roles within all the genres of performing arts; the comedy, the musical, the contemporary drama and the classics. When she now receives the Hedda Award it is just because she is such a versatile actress, switching between being charming, witty, hysterical, seducing, love hungry, distance, refined and deeply unhappy with such playful ease. She gets the award for original, personal interpretations of Maria Steuber in Time and the Room and for the portrait of a woman who is driven to the outermost limits by hatred and love, Christine Mannon in Mourning Becomes Electra, both at The Norwegian Theatre.

    The best supporting actress award goes to Gjertrud Jynge."

Nominated
  • Mariann Hole

    Mariann Hole for the role of Helene in Orphans, directed by Terje Strømdahl, The National Theatre at Torshov:

    Mariann Hole studied at Nordic Institute of Stage and Studio (NISS) from2000 to2003, and then studied acting at Oslo National Academy of the Arts(2004-2007). She made her debut at The Norwegian Touring Theatreas Ophelia in Yngve Sundvor's direction of Hamlet in 2007, and then played in Jon Fosse's The Child, in collaboration between The Norwegian Touring Theatre and Rogaland Theatre, directed by Fridtjov Såheim. She came to The National Theatre in 2008, interpreting, among other roles, Alyosha in The Brothers Karamazov with Oleg Kulikov as the director, Nina in Chekhov's The Seagull directed by Sofia Jupither, and the title role of Victoria Meirik's direction of Romeo and Juliet. Since the autumn of 2010 she has, with Thorbjørn Harr and Jan Gunnar Røise, been responsible for the artistic direction of the Komilab (literally: Comedy Lab) project at The Torshov Theatre.

  • Helga Guren

    Helga Guren for the role of Lucifer in Sonny, directed by Bjørn Ravn Carlsen, and for her role in The Nightingale, directed by Øyvind Osmo Eriksen and Ida Wigdel, both at Rogaland Theatre:

    Helga Guren was educated at The National Academy of Theatre in Oslo, Esper Studio New York and Stockholm Academy of Dramatic Arts (SADA). Guren has taken part in productions at The Norwegian Touring Theatre,The Norwegian Theatre, Hålogaland Theatre and The Royal Dramatic Theatrein Stockholm. She has also been active as a gymnast and acrobat. She plays the Hardanger fiddle and has sung with Alastair Laurence Jazz Trio, among others. In addition she has taken part in international dance and theatre productions, among other places at MDT (Moderna Dansteatern) in Stockholm and ImPulsTanz in Vienna. The autumn of 2008 she acted in the musical Little Me, a collaboration project between The Norwegian Touring Theatre and Rogaland Theatre, and in 2009 she took part in the theatre's production of The Tempest. The autumn of 2009 she was at The Norwegian Theatre, as part of Du ska få en dag i mårå* (You will get your day tomorrow).

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

  • Gjertrud Jynge

    Gjertrud Jynge for the role of Christine Mannon in Mourning Becomes Electra, directed by Eirik Stubø, and for the role of Maria Steuber in Time and the Room, directed by Eirik Ulfsby, both at The Norwegian Theatre:

    Gjertrud Jynge was born in 1966, and attended The National Academy of Theatrefrom 1990 to 1993. The same year she was employed by Rogaland Theatre where she made her debut as der Hedvig in The Wild Duck, followed by Nora in A doll's house, both directed by Jan Håkanson. In 1996 The Norwegian Theatre hired her, and she has worked for the theatre since then. Here her many roles include Milja in Oskar Braaten's The Brat, Clytemnestra in Aeschylus' Orestes and Johanna in Taus musikk* (Mute Music) by Lars Norén. She has done parts in musicals such as Forever Young and Which Witch, she has been the woman in green and Anitra in Peer Gynt, and the Marquise in The Second Surprise of Love. She has also acted in several movies and TV series, and in 1996 she got Anders Jahre's Award for younger artists.

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

Best visual design

Winners
  • Boya Bøckman

    "Stage design is often today the most exciting aspect of many productions, and whether the visual takes a minimalist or maximalist form, the stage image may add an exciting dimension of its own to the performance. At times this year's winner lets his particular talent be led by a chief stage design project, and successfully so. But the winner gets the award for having created a dizzyingly beautiful three-dimensional universe complementing and giving life to a text that is both simple and mysterious, into which the rich, diverse visual expression opens endlessly many free associations.

    The best visual design award goes to Boya Bøckman for a theatrical (in the best possible sense of the word) video and light design for De Utvalgte's The Art of Being Tamed at Black Box Teater."

Nominated
  • Olav Myrtvedt

    Olav Myrtvedt for the stage design of The Misanthrope, directed by Sigrid Strøm Reibo, Rogaland Theatre:
    Olav Myrtvedt was educated as a stage designer at The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts - The School of Design, and since 1995 he has worked with stage design and costume design within theatre and dance. He has been responsible for set design and costumes for productions at The Norwegian Theatre, The Norwegian Touring Theatre, Rogaland Theatre, Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre) and The National Theatre. He has also worked for The Gothenburg Opera, Malmö City Theatre and Stockholm City Theatre, where he did the stage design and costumes for A Midsummer Night's Dream, directed by Alexander Mørk-Eidem. In 2011 he got the Danish Reumert Award for the stage design for Twelfth Night at Aalborg Theatre. In 2003 he represented Norway during The Prague Quadrennial with the stage design for three Fosse worldwide premieres; The Name, Night Sings its Songs and The Son.

  • Chloé Obolensky

    Chloé Obolensky for the stage design of Ghosts, directed by Stein Winge, The National Stage:
    Chloé Obolensky was born in Hellas, and was educated in France and England. She started her career in Hellas as instructor Karel Kuhn worked based on a play by Aristophanes. All the time from 1981 she worked closely with Peter Brook, but she has also worked with theatre, film and opera in Netherlands, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom and Austria and in 2004 she was responsible for stage design and costumes for Stein Winge's direction of Strindberg's A Dream Play at The Norwegian Theatre. She also is interested in photography and has had the book The Russian Empire: A portrait in photographs published. In 2000 she got the Molière Award, the theatre award of France, for the costumes for Peines de coeur d'une chatte française* (The Heart Pains of a French Female Cat).

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the French title's literal meaning.

  • Boya Bøckman

    Boya Bøckman for the visual design of De Utvalgtes The Art of Being Tamed, Black Box Teater:
    Boya Bøckman is a self-taught video designer and visual artist. He is a member of De Utvalgte, an independent performing arts company established in 1993, but he also frequently collaborates with Fabula Rasa, and was the man behind the video design for Istalia, produced by Fabula Rasa in collaboration with The National Theatre. He was the video designer for then artistic director Eirik Stubø's presentation of Elfriede Jelinek during The Contemporary Stage Festival 2005, for Jelinek's Ulrike Marie Stuart in 2007, and for Mourning Becomes Electra at The Norwegian Theatre the spring of 2012. Whether Boya Bøckman emphasises the photography, as in Jon Fosse's Shadows, or his video projections, as in Jimmy Young or Drømmen* (The Dream) he expands the situations onstage, adds new and challenging content, and a particularly poetic dimension.

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

Honorary Hedda

From and including the 2012 awards the Hedda committee, not the Hedda Jury, takes the decision whether The Honorary Hedda is to be given out and if so, to whom.

In 2012 the committee consists of:

Hanne Tømta, CEO/artistic director The National Theatre (leader of the committee)
Ellen Horn, CEO/artistic director The Norwegian Touring Theatre
Kristian Seltun, CEO/artistic director Trøndelag Theatre
Jon Refsdal Moe, CEO/artistic director Black Box Teater
Hauk Heyerdahl, leader of The Norwegian Actors' Equity Association
Elisabeth Egseth Hansen, freelance producer/consultant, former performing arts consultant for Arts Council Norway and artistic director of Avant Garden

The award is not given out annually, but when a person is found particularly worthy.

Winners
  • IdaLou Larsen

    The Honorary Hedda goes to theatre critic and the jury member and secretary of the jury through many years, IdaLou Larsen. The Hedda committee gave the following reason:

    "Hedda's Honorary Award 2012 goes to a person who has made her mark on Norwegian theatre for more than 30 years, though not as a performer, but in an as important function. The recipient enjoys great respect from her fellow colleagues, but also from actors, theatre managers, directors and stage designers, yes, most in the theatre community. Few, if any, have such a wide experience, and such an open and curious approach.

    The award winner's voice in criticising society can't be underestimated. The critical comments have been precise, thoroughly reflected upon, and have often lifted the discussion out of mundane sentiments. This is combined with an analytic ability and vast knowledge. As a person to define the terms of the theatre discourse the winner may have her most important role. Her voice can be heard far beyond the theatre salon.

    The recipient has been involved in numerous commissions, committees and discussions about a wide spectrum of theatre political subjects. She has been a sharp and alert observer of the different political parties' cultural programs and the national culture and theatre politics. As a control organ in her own device the winner has analysed and commented, and posed the uncomfortable questions to the politicians. But the theatres and we theatre managers have also been told off.

    The critical, societal and political emphasis has sharpened the theatres. In this way one can say that the award winner has had power in Norway's theatres, through being read, listened to and discussed. The theatres haven't dared to sit idly, they have had to reflect, answer and at times also change decisions.

    An important case she has fought for is more quality productions for children and youth, and perhaps we can also thank her that more challenging theatre for children is being produced. As a spokesperson for gender balance in the theatre the winner has moved mileposts and focus, and she has cleared the way for our generation. With a rhetorical edge came the statement "Feminism today should be about getting girls to understand that they are thinking beings".

    Among the other golden quotes we remember is the response toHans Rossiné when he wanted to downsize the small theatres: UPSIZE the regional theatres! Or her response to the debate about Big Brother TV: "To become a celebrity has suddenly become more important than being capable. That one in addition can become a celebrity in being as unsympathetic as possible, is indeed uncomfortable."

    During her career the award winner has watched well over 3000 productions. Nobody in Norway is near having as good an overlook of Norwegian theatre the past 30 years.

    And we are convinced it will continue! We think and hope that the theatres will also be visited frequently in the future, and we are convinced her voice will be heard in the radio, newspapers, journals, blogs and debates.

    The award winner gets the award for her critical involvement, for her endless urge to write, her work with The Hedda Jury and all in all...

    Rarely Norwegian performing arts have been treated more seriously!

    Deep respect and massive love stand behind the decision to give The Honorary Hedda 2012 to IdaLou Larsen."

Production of the year

Winners
  • Abraham's Children

    "The production of the year is unique in its genre. It holds high artistic quality, while insightfully, objectively illuminates a political discussion that suddenly became red-hot after the event turning Norway upside-down July 22 last year. Despite its serious theme, the production switches liberatingly between the sombre and humour, and it manages to entertain its audience while provoking reflection. The production is a pedagogic, thought-provoking presentation of the very foundation of our Christian culture. Written and performed by Svein Tindberg, who alone onstage maintains the very magic of theatre, and for more than two hours leads involving, immediate communication with the audience.

    The production of the year is Abraham's Children at The Norwegian Theatre."

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

Nominated
  • Mourning Becomes Electra

    Mourning Becomes Electra, The Norwegian Theatre:
    Text by: Eugene O'Neill. Processed by: Cecilia Ölveczky and Eirik Stubø. Translation by: Ola E. Bø. Directed by: Eirik Stubø. Stage design/costume design: Kari Gravklev. Light design: Torkel Skjærven. Sound design: Vibeke Blydt-Hansen. Video design: Boya Bøckman. Musicians: Steinar Sønk Nickelsen, Erik Nylander, Håvard Stubø.
    Onstage: Kirsti Stubø, Torbjørn Eriksen, Lasse Kolsrud, Sverre Bentzen, Gjertrud Jynge, Espen Løvås, Marie Blokhus

    «... grand, well-made and coherent theatre.» Vårt Land
    «Sensationally good, personal theatre. (...) This is theatre of international calibre.» Aftenposten

  • Abraham's Children

    Abraham's Children, The Norwegian Theatre, The main stage (Hovudscenen):

    Direction: Kjetil Bang-Hansen. Stage design: John-Kristian Alsaker. Sound design: Ola Bråten.
    Onstage: Svein Tindberg

    «Informative, alive and deeply significant», Vårt Land
    «... unites an important political message and high-quality performing arts.» Klassekampen

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

  • Metamorphosis

    The Metamorphosis, The National Theatre, the main stage (Hovedscenen):
    Writer: Franz Kafka. Translation: Øyvind Berg. Processed by: David Farr and Gisli Örn Gardarsson. Dramatised by: David Farr and Gisli Örn Gardarsson. Music and lyrics: Nick Cave/Warren Ellis. Directed by: Gisli Örn Gardarsson. Stage design: Börkur Jònsson. Sound design: Nick Manning. Light design: Björn Helgason. Masks: Greta Bremseth.
    Onstage: Gisli Örn Gardarsson, Ingvar E. Sigurdsson, Yngvil Armand, Inge Jansen, Kim Haugen, Christian Skolmen

    «... an explosive, physical theatre production», Aftenposten
    «Franz Kafka's vulnerable, introvert poetry work (is) lifted like a flower from the grey mist», Dag og Tid.

  • Jeg var Fritz Moen* (I was Fritz Moen)

    Jeg var Fritz Moen* (I was Fritz Moen), The Norwegian Touring Theatre/Teater Manu
    Text by: Arthur Johansen. Processed by: Kjersti Horn and Tine Thomassen in collaboration with the ensemble. Directed by: Kjersti Horn. Stage design and costume design: Erika Magnusson. Light design: Tobias Leira. Sound design: Erik Hedin.
    Onstage: Bo Hårdell, Ronny Patrick Jacobsen, Emil Johnsen, Are J. Rødsand and Mads Sjøgård

    «Sometimes a theatre production hit you like a fist. Jeg var Fritz Moen* (I was Fritz Moen) does.» VG
    «...a strong and moving portrait of becoming an outsider», Dagsavisen

  • Norge - Brasil* (Norway - Brazil)

    Norge-Brasil* (Norway-Brazil), The Norwegian Theatre, the main stage (Hovudscenen):

    Text by: Are Kalvø. Music by: Helge Førde. Directed by: Erik Ulfsby. Stage design/costume design: Mia Runningen. Choreography: Jonas Digerud. Conductor: Svenn Erik Kristoffersen. Light design: Ola Bråten. Sound design: Nikolai Bergstrøm. Musicians: Svenn Erik Kristoffersen, Rune Arnesen, Bjørn Rabben, Ida Aubert Bang, Nils Jansen, Ståle Sletner.
    Onstage: Charlotte Frogner, Ida Holten Worsøe, Pål Christian Eggen, Jon Bleiklie Devik, Niklas Gundersen, Paul Ottar Haga

    «A bubbling, imaginative and fast-paced theatre fairytale», Aftenposten
    «Football art: When football meets opera in Norway-Brazil, The Norwegian Theatre has a winner.» Dagbladet

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

Special artistic achievement

Winners
  • Jan Gunnar Røise

    "The season 2011-2012 has been special in that the theatre has become more concerned with contemporary times. In its way the special artistic achievement of the year is contemporary, too, in that the aim with the project has been to explore all facets of one of the most popular expressions of our time. The initiators have succeeded beyond all expectations, and will be missed now that the project belongs to the past. In particular one can rejoice in the fact that three actors in establishing a unique theatre laboratory have exceeded all that is expected from them.

    The special artistic achievement award goes to Thorbjørn Harr, Mariann Hole and Jan Gunnar Røise for excellent completion of Komilab* (The Comedy Lab) 1 to 6 at The Torshov Theatre."

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

  • Mariann Hole

    "The season 2011-2012 has been special in that the theatre has become more concerned with contemporary times. In its way the special artistic achievement of the year is contemporary, too, in that the aim with the project has been to explore all facets of one of the most popular expressions of our time. The initiators have succeeded beyond all expectations, and will be missed now that the project belongs to the past. In particular one can rejoice in the fact that three actors in establishing a unique theatre laboratory have exceeded all that is expected from them.

    The special artistic achievement award goes to Thorbjørn Harr, Mariann Hole and Jan Gunnar Røise for excellent completion of Komilab* (The Comedy Lab) 1 to 6 at The Torshov Theatre."

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

  • Thorbjørn Harr

    "The season 2011-2012 has been special in that the theatre has become more concerned with contemporary times. In its way the special artistic achievement of the year is contemporary, too, in that the aim with the project has been to explore all facets of one of the most popular expressions of our time. The initiators have succeeded beyond all expectations, and will be missed now that the project belongs to the past. In particular one can rejoice in the fact that three actors in establishing a unique theatre laboratory have exceeded all that is expected from them.

    The special artistic achievement award goes to Thorbjørn Harr, Mariann Hole and Jan Gunnar Røise for excellent completion of Komilab* (The Comedy Lab) 1 to 6 at The Torshov Theatre."

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

Nominated
  • Oleg Glusjkov

    Oleg Glushkov for the choreography for The Misanthrope, Rogaland Theatre and for Black Rider, Hålogaland Theatre:

    Oleg Glushkov is a Russian choreographer. He has for instance been responsible for the choreography of several productions at Moscow Art Theatre, one can mention Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and The Master and Margarita. It seems Sigrid Strøm Reibo got to known him while she studied in Moscow, because they have collaborated on most of the productions she has done in Norway. Naturally, he created no choreography for her Norwegian debut, Waiting for Godot, nor for Tøffe Taffy Huleboer (literally: Tough Taffy Cave Dweller, based on Kipling's short story How the first letter was written) at Brageteatret. But as early as the spring of 2011 he choreographed for her direction of Haugtussa* (The Hulder) at Rogaland Theatre, and they have later collaborated on The Black Rider in Tromsø, as well as The Misanthrope in Stavanger.

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

  • The National Sami Theatre

    The Norwegian National Sami Theatre Company Beaivváš:

    In 1981 the independent theatre company Beaivváš was established with Kautokeino as the hosting municipality. In 1982 government support was for the first time allotted to establishing a Sami theatre company, and in 1987 a three-year test period with Beaivváš as an institutional Sami theatre company in Kautokeino started. In 1991 Beaivváš was given status as a regional theatre. This status it has until The Norwegian Ministry of Culture in 2002 transferred all the money formerly earmarked to Sami cultural purposes to the Sami Parliament. Thus Beaivváš Sámi Teáhter changed its name to Beaivváš Sámi Našunálateáhter (English:The Norwegian National Sami Theatre CompanyBeaivváš). The theatre performs in Kautokeino, Karasjok, Tana, Nesseby, Alta, (Kirkenes), Tromsø, Oslo, Karesuando, Kiruna and Gällivarre, among other places. In addition the theatre company has done visiting performances in Russia and the Nordic countries.

  • Not directly hurt

    Not directly hurt, staged readings of Maria Tryti Vennerød's blog:

    A collaboration between the publisher Cappelen Damm and Dramatikkens Hus; "for the sake of contemporary interest, to find new ways in meeting and involving new groups of audiences". During the trial against Anders Behring Breivik the playwright Maria Tryti Vennerød writes literary texts about the situation in our country. Every Thursday at four p.m. directors and actors from Dramatikkens Hus performs the texts in Cappelen Damm's bookstore Halvbroren. The first reading took place April 26 and the last is planned for June 22. Among the directors are Tom Remlov, Ole Johan Skjelbred, Kai Johnsen and the independent theatre company De Utvalgte. Maria Tryti Vennerød has read her own texts, but they are also read by actors such Gjertrud Jynge and Kirsti Stubø.

  • Komilab-prosjektet* (The Comedy Lab Project) by Thorbjørn Harr, Mariann Hole and Jan Gunnar Røise:

    In 2010 the actors Thorbjørn Harr, Mariann Hole and Jan Gunnar Røise got acceptance for the comedy laboratory idea from artistic director Hanne Tømta, with the stated purpose "to do scientific research on the genre of comedy and to make comedy with meaning - not just silly nonsense". The project started the autumn of 2010 with Mr. Kolpert. Next followed Endelig skjer det noe* (Finally something happens) by Thomas Seeberg Torjussen and Ti liv* (Ten lives) by Kjetil Bang-Hansen the spring of 2011. The autumn of 2011 started with Kafka - Komilab 4.1* (Kafka - Comedy Lab 4.1) and continued with An Oak Tree by Tim Crouch, Else Kåss Furuseth's monologue Kondolerer* (My Condolences) and ended with Dennis Kelly's Orphans. The spring of 2012 started with Comedy Lab No. 6, Jåtåkdag* (Yysplyseday), and the project ended with A Behanding in Spokane by Martin McDonagh.

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.