The Hedda Award 2006

Theatre project of the year

The theatre project of the year is to surpass other productions through:

*current interest

*format

*context/event

Nominations

  • Hedda Gabler

    Hedda Gabler, Trøndelag Theatre:

    "The adaptation in question of Henrik Ibsen's intricate text seems clearing and efficient. To lift the action to our time is not just acceptable - but near necessary to give the play dramatic life."

    Martin Nordvik, Adressa

    "Hedda Gabler at Trøndelag Theatre is a consistent performance, intelligently directed with fine actors in all ages. It breaks with Hedda anno 1890, but conveys an unfiltered Ibsenesque destiny in its own contemporary age."

    Yngve Kvistad, VG

    "...at its terms this is an intense and successful modernisation of the play, in a direct and new version"

    Andreas Wiese, Dagbladet

  • Henrik Ibsen - En dannelsesreise i Telemark* (Henrik Ibsen - An Education Journey in Telemark)

    Henrik Ibsen - En dannelsesreise i Telemark* (Henrik Ibsen - An Education Journey in Telemark), Ibsen Theatre:

    "Henrik Ibsen - en dannelsesreise i Telemark has entered the boat Henrik Ibsen and races through the Telemark channel with this summer's most distinct theatre experience aboard. (...) Ibsen Theatre has stretched the bow to the point of bursting. It doesn't matter much if not all is as good. This is unique."

    Kari Gisholt, Varden

    "Ibsen Theatre has thrown itself into deep waters with this ambitious production, but the theatre has reached the end with heads well above water, if not better still... All in all this has become a unique, brave happening spun around the poetry of Ibsen."

    Anne Lise Surtevju, TA

    "As such Ibsen Theatre's Dannelsesreise becomes more than a tourist project, a journey with ambitions, to give its audience experiences as well as challenges."

    Andreas Wiese, Dagbladet

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

Winners

  • Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre)

    "The criteria for The Hedda Award demands that the theatre project of the year, formerly called the production of the year, is to surpass other good productions through being contemporary, and an event in itself. Preferably the production is also to be original in form.

    The winner of the year satisfies all these demands. It is splendidly exotic and entirely different, it is characterised by playful, but utterly conscious direction, amazing stage design and good acting. At the same time it grants the playwright's text justice, and it builds a highly necessary bridge between the theatre and our new citizens.

    The winner of the year is Bollywood Ibsen - The Lady from the Indian Sea."

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    Best supporting actor

    The select excellent performance is to surpass other good performances through:

    *qualities of craft

    *artistic qualities

    *unpredictability

    The Hedda Awards 2006 were given out during a ceremony Sunday September 3 at The National Theatre.

    The actors Gjertrud Jynge and Kim Haugen hosted the show. The awards were presented by Eva Joly, Tancred Ibsen, director of Bergen International Festival Per Boye Hansen, minister of finance Kristin Halvorsen, violinist Arve Tellefsen, Knut Nærum, ombudsman for children Reidar Hjermann, actress Lise Fjeldstad, lawyer Abid Q. Raja, director Stein Roger Bull and writer Vigdis Hjorth.

    The jury consisted of IdaLou Larsen, Tom Remlov, Kristian Seltun, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Andreas Wiese.

    Nominations

    • Nils Ole Oftebro

      Nils Ole Oftebro for the role of Mariano in A Spanish Play by Yasmina Reza, Amfiscenen (The Amphi Stage), The National Theatre:

      "Nils Ole Oftebro graduated from The National Academy of Theatre in 1969, and made his debut at the National Theatre two years later in the role of Federmesser in The Fussy Man. At The National Theatre he has played some hundred different roles, we may mention his interpretations of Peer in Peer Gynt (1985), of Don Juan in Molière's comedy (1990), of Vidkun Quisling in Cecilie Løveid's Maria Q (1994), of Doctor Rank in A Doll's House (1999) and of Hallvard Solness in Ibsen's The Master Builder (2003). During the 1980es he was the artistic leader of The Torshov Theatre. Nils Ole Oftebro has acted in a number of movies and he has hosted TV shows. Twice he has won The Amanda Award (1986 and 1998). In 1990 he got The Norwegian Critics' Award, 1998 the Stiklestad award and in 2003 he was selected as the audio book voice of the year."

    • Randolf Walderhaug

      Randolf Walderhaug for the role of Per Degn in Erasmus Montanus by Ludvig Holberg, Teatret Vårt (Our Theatre) in Molde:

      "Randolf Walderhaug was educated at New York University, where he completed a three-year long Theatre Program in 1984. For a long time he worked for The National Stage, where he played in Jeppe of the Hill (1987), Holberg's Ulysses from Ithaca (1990), Orestes (1991), The People of Hellemyr (1992) and Hamletmachine by Heiner Müller (1993). In 1991 he was Ernst Mensen in Ragnar Hovland's Gjest Baardsen døyr åleine ved Nilens bredd* (Gjest Baardsen dies alone at the banks of the Nile). At Teatret Vårt (Our Theatre) he has played in Three Sisters (1994), in Rosmersholm (1997), Miss Julie (1998), Hedda Gabler (2001) and Nathan the Wise (2003). In 2004 he visited Trøndelag Theatre where he took part in Terrorism by the Presnyakov brothers and People Annihilation - or My Liver is Senseless by Werner Schwab. He is an eager sportsman, he translates, and he has had several assignments as a director at Teatret Vårt (Our Theatre)."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    • Henrik Mestad

      Henrik Mestad for the role of Kurt in The Dance of Death by August Strindberg at Amfiscenen (The Amphi Stage, The National Theatre:

      "Henrik Mestad graduated from The National Academy of Theatre in 1991, and made his debut at The National Theatre the same year in The Vikings at Helgeland by Henrik Ibsen. Since then he has played 55 different roles at The National Theatre - among other things, he has been an interesting Thorvald Helmer in A Doll's House (1999) , Rochefort in The Three Musketeers (2001), engineer Borgheim in Little Eyolf (2002) and the son in the prize-awarded production of Thomas Bernhard's Histrionics. At Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre) he has played Johannes in Victoria (2004), whereas he at Teatret Vårt (Our Theatre) was Ask Burlefot in Morten Borgersen's adaption of Lasso round the Moon (1996). He has also written two productions he has performed himself, Lik meg når jeg er teit* (Like me when I am a dork) (1993) and Nansens sønn* (Nansen's Son) (2002)."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    Winners

    • A Spanish Play

      "For 35 years this year's winner has delighted, entertained and moved his audience through interpreting the most diverse male roles. He is honoured for an excellent interpretation in which he masterfully balanced his acting between illusion and irony, impressing with his technical brilliance and efficiently using all his stage charisma. The play was a typical ensemble piece in which he, with certain insight, found his rightful place.

      The best supporting actor award goes to Nils Ole Oftebro for his elegant interpretation of Mariano, 'an immoral sissy', in A Spanish Play."

    • Nils Ole Oftebro

      "For 35 years this year's winner has delighted, entertained and moved his audience through interpreting the most diverse male roles. He is honoured for an excellent interpretation in which he masterfully balanced his acting between illusion and irony, impressing with his technical brilliance and efficiently using all his stage charisma. The play was a typical ensemble piece in which he, with certain insight, found his rightful place.

      The best supporting actor award goes to Nils Ole Oftebro for his elegant interpretation of Mariano, 'an immoral sissy', in A Spanish Play."

    Best leading actress

    The select excellent performance is to surpass other good performances through:

    *qualities of craft

    *artistic qualities

    *unpredictability

    The Hedda Awards 2006 were given out during a ceremony Sunday September 3 at The National Theatre.

    The actors Gjertrud Jynge and Kim Haugen hosted the show. The awards were presented by Eva Joly, Tancred Ibsen, director of Bergen International Festival Per Boye Hansen, minister of finance Kristin Halvorsen, violinist Arve Tellefsen, Knut Nærum, ombudsman for children Reidar Hjermann, actress Lise Fjeldstad, lawyer Abid Q. Raja, director Stein Roger Bull and writer Vigdis Hjorth.

    The jury consisted of IdaLou Larsen, Tom Remlov, Kristian Seltun, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Andreas Wiese.

    Nominations

    • Trine Wiggen

      Trine Wiggen for the role of Una in Blackbird by David Harrower, the venue called Malersalen, The National Theatre:

      "Trine Wiggen graduated from The National Academy of Theatre in 1994. The same year she made her debut at The National Stage in The Name by Jon Fosse, and in Bergen she was Nille in Jeppe of the Hill and Solveig in Peer Gynt. In 1997 she came to The National Theatre, where her roles include Stella in A Streetcar Named Desire (2003), the daughter in Lars Norén's Vinterforvaring* (Winter Storage) (2003) and Fanny Wilton in Sebastian Hartmann's controversial John Gabriel Borkman (2004). In 2002 she was Honey in the Hedda-awarded Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf? at Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre) and in she was Phaedra in Jean Racine's Phaedra, staged by Eirik Stubø for Swedish Riksteatern. In 2005 she was nominated for the Amanda Award in the best leading actress category for her efforts in the movie An Enemy of the People."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    • Ingunn Beate Øyen

      Ingunn Beate Øyen for the role of Richard II in Richard II by William Shakespeare, the venue called Prøvesalen, The Norwegian Theatre:

      "Ingunn Beate Øyen hails from Inderøy in Nord-Trøndelag, and rumour has it she is one of the many who chose the acting profession after taking part in the Stiklestad spectacle called The Saint Olav Drama. In 1992 she graduated from The National Academy of Theatre, and the same year she started working for The Norwegian Theatre, where her first role was Catherine in Arthur Miller's A View from the Bridge. In 1995 she played Joan of Arc in Jean Anouilh's The Lark, in 1997 she took part in Fuente Ovejuna by Lope de Vega, and in 2000 she was Barbara in Fear Eats the Soul by Fassbinder. In 2002 she visited The National Stage, where she took part in 1900: Maskespill* (1900: Play of the Mask) and 1900: Maskefall* (1900: Fall of the Mask), a dramatisation of Gunnar Staalesen's family saga."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    • Anna Bache-Wiig

      Anna Bache-Wiig for the role of Hedda in Hedda Gabler by Henrik Ibsen, the venue called Gamle Scene, Trøndelag Theatre:

      "Anna Bache-Wiig graduated from The National Academy of Theatre in 1998. She came to The National Stage in 2001, prior to which she worked for Trøndelag Theatre and Rogaland Theatre. In Bergen her roles include Antigone in Antigone by Aleksander Öberg and Mats Kjelbye (2002), Sophie in The Cold Heart by Astrid Saalbach (2003), Helena in A Midsummer Night's Dream (2004) and Ronia in Ronia, the Robber's Daughter (2003-04). The autumn of 2005 she visited Rogaland Theatre, playing the role of Constance Mozart in Amadeus, and the spring of 2006 Hedda in Per-Olav Sørensen's modern version of Hedda Gabler. She had parts in the movies Buddy (2003) and Next Door (2005) and is also a writer with two published books behind her. She made her debut in 2003 with the childhood novel Det aller fineste (literally: The Very Best), and last year she released Sommernattsdrømmen (literally: The Summer Night Dream) in which theatre plays an important role."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    Winners

    • Richard II

      "This year's winner has interpreted a number of different roles at the theatre for which she has worked most of the time since graduating from The National Academy of Theatre. With equal competence she has interpreted classics such as Shakespeare and contemporary playwrights such as Jon Fosse. She has played mild women such as Celia in As You Like It and strong women such as Jeanne d'Arc. But she gets the award for her nuanced and convincing interpretation of a man - a powerful, yet weak and complex man.

      The best leading actress award goes to Ingunn Beate Øyen for her interpretation of King Richard II at The Norwegian Theatre."

    • Ingunn Beate Øyen

      "This year's winner has interpreted a number of different roles at the theatre for which she has worked most of the time since graduating from The National Academy of Theatre. With equal competence she has interpreted classics such as Shakespeare and contemporary playwrights such as Jon Fosse. She has played mild women such as Celia in As You Like It and strong women such as Jeanne d'Arc. But she gets the award for her nuanced and convincing interpretation of a man - a powerful, yet weak and complex man.

      The best leading actress award goes to Ingunn Beate Øyen for her interpretation of King Richard II at The Norwegian Theatre."

    Best leading actor

    The select excellent performance is to surpass other good performances through:

    *qualities of craft

    *artistic qualities

    *unpredictability

    The Hedda Awards 2006 were given out during a ceremony Sunday September 3 at The National Theatre.

    The actors Gjertrud Jynge and Kim Haugen hosted the show. The awards were presented by Eva Joly, Tancred Ibsen, director of Bergen International Festival Per Boye Hansen, minister of finance Kristin Halvorsen, violinist Arve Tellefsen, Knut Nærum, ombudsman for children Reidar Hjermann, actress Lise Fjeldstad, lawyer Abid Q. Raja, director Stein Roger Bull and writer Vigdis Hjorth.

    The jury consisted of IdaLou Larsen, Tom Remlov, Kristian Seltun, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Andreas Wiese.

    Nominations

    • Anders Dale

      Anders Dale for the role of the dreamer in Dostoevsky's Drømmere* (Dreamers) at the main stage, Rogaland Theatre:

      "Anders Dale came directly to Rogaland Theatre after graduating from The National Academy of Theatre in 1994. He made his debut in Svein Sturla Hungnes' staging of Tony Kushner's Angels in America, in which he played Joe. He is a very versatile actor whose many roles include Josef K in Kafka's The Trial (1996), Meursault in The Stranger by Albert Camus, and Hitler in Georg Tabori's Mein Kampf (1999). The winter season 1994/1995 he impressed greatly as the vulnerable and amiable, but tragic Smike in Rogaland Theatre's marathon production of Nicholas Nickleby, and the spring of 2005 he was Koroviev in Yngve Sundvor's version of Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita. This spring he made his debut as a director with Tape by American Stephen Bleber, a very well-received production. Other than that, he was nominated for the TV Award Gullruten in 1997 for his efforts in Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation's drama series Blodsbånd* (Blood Ties)."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    • Øystein Røger

      Øystein Røger for the role of the unknown in The Road to Damascus by August Strindberg, the venue called Amfiscenen (The Amphi Stage), The National Theatre:

      "Øystein Røger graduated from The National Academy of Theatre in 1986, and with others from his year, he started the independent theatre company De Unges Forbund (literally: League of Youth, as in Ibsen's play). The spring of 1987 the group performed a wildly vital version of John Ford's tragedy 'Tis a Pity She's a Whore. But as early as in 1988 he was at The National Stage, where he stayed until he in 1993 came to The National Theatre. He has worked there since then. Johannes Rosmer in Rosmersholm and Oswald in Ghosts are among his memorable roles at The National Stage. At The National Theatre his roles include Septimus Hodge in Tom Stoppard's Arcadia (1995), and Sir Robert Chiltern in An Ideal Husband by Oscar Wilde (1996). Øystein Røger also is one of our best Jon Fosse interpreters and he has had leading roles in six of The National Theatre's Fosse productions, including Dream of Autumn and Winter. He was part of the artistic management of The Torshov Theatre in 2000-2003 and had great success with Kåre Conradi in Stones in his pockets. He has also taken part in several fiction films, TV and radio productions, and in 2002 he got the award of The National Theatre's friend association."

    • Bjørn Skagestad

      Bjørn Skagestad for the role of Ray in Blackbird by David Harrower, the venue called Malersalen (literally: The Painters' Hall, The National Theatre:

      "Bjørn Skagestad has been an employee of The National Theatre's since 1988. Before then he was at The Norwegian Theatre, where his roles include Julian in Emperor and Galilean (1987). At The National Theatre he has interpreted, among much else, many of Ibsen's characters, Ejlert Lövborg in Hedda Gabler, Oswald in Ghosts (both in 1988), Helmer in A Doll's House (1990), Erhard Borkman in John Gabriel Borkman (1991), Hjalmar Ekdal in The Wild Duck (1996), Johannes Rosmer in Rosmersholm (1998), Brack in Hedda Gabler (2002) and wholesaler Werle in The Wild Duck (2004). He has had central parts in three plays by Chekhov - Uncle Vanya in 1994, The Seagull in 1998 and The Cherry Orchard (2003). In 1999 he was Faust opposite Monna Tandberg's Mephisto, he had the role of politician Paul Lange in Bjørnson's Paul Lange and Tora Parsberg (2000), and Gustav in Strindberg's Creditors in 2005. He also has taken parts in several movies, and played Erlend in Kristin Lavransdatter. He received Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation's radio theatre award Blå fugl (literally: Blue Bird) in 1991 and the Honorary Award of Per Aabel in 1998."

    Winners

    • The Road to Damascus

      "This year's winner is a versatile actor, who has excelled in range ever since he started his career 20 years ago: He is a versatile character actor while mastering the genre of comedy, and - not least - he is one of our foremost interpreters of Jon Fosse's drama. During this season he has made his mark with a tour de force in which he expands his superior understanding of text with a brave, expressively physical expression.

      The best leading actor award goes to Øystein Røger for his interpretation of the unknown in The Road to Damascus at The National Theatre."

    • Øystein Røger

      "This year's winner is a versatile actor, who has excelled in range ever since he started his career 20 years ago: He is a versatile character actor while mastering the genre of comedy, and - not least - he is one of our foremost interpreters of Jon Fosse's drama. During this season he has made his mark with a tour de force in which he expands his superior understanding of text with a brave, expressively physical expression.

      The best leading actor award goes to Øystein Røger for his interpretation of the unknown in The Road to Damascus at The National Theatre."

    Best visual design

    Best stage/costume/lighting design is surpass other good works through:

    *conceptual autonomy (that the stage design is a work in itself) balanced against the conceptual function of it (the dramaturgic dispositions of the space)

    *relation to related art forms (visual arts, design, architecture)

    *innovation, in regard to the stage design/theatre field and in regard to related art forms.

    The Hedda Awards 2006 were given out during a ceremony Sunday September 3 at The National Theatre.

    The actors Gjertrud Jynge and Kim Haugen hosted the show. The awards were presented by Eva Joly, Tancred Ibsen, director of Bergen International Festival Per Boye Hansen, minister of finance Kristin Halvorsen, violinist Arve Tellefsen, Knut Nærum, ombudsman for children Reidar Hjermann, actress Lise Fjeldstad, lawyer Abid Q. Raja, director Stein Roger Bull and writer Vigdis Hjorth.

    The jury consisted of IdaLou Larsen, Tom Remlov, Kristian Seltun, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Andreas Wiese.

    Nominations

    • Kathrine Hysing

      Kathrine Hysing for the stage design and costumes for Drømmere* (Dreamers), Rogaland Theatre:

      "Kathrine Hysing was educated at The National Academy of Craft and Art Industry in Oslo and at Stockholm Academy of Dramatic Arts (SADA) in Stockholm. Since then she has worked as a stage designer and costume designer within theatre, ballet and opera. She is also the designer of the summer exhibition at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Per Spook – Norwegian Fashion Designer in Paris. At The Norwegian Opera she has been responsible for the stage design and costumes for about 20 productions throughout the years. Outside of Scandinavia she has been involved in opera productions in Aix-en-Provence, Lyon, Paris, Nice, Antwerp, Glasgow, Dortmund and Stuttgart. She has been connected to Rogaland Theatre as a stage designer a number of times former to this. One of the large productions there was Garman & Worse & Co (1997) in the old gymnastics hall of Stavanger, where she recreated the town of Stavanger in miniature."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    • Juratè Paulèkaitè

      Jurate Paulekaite for the stage design for The Road to Damascus, The National Theatre:

      "Jurate Paulekaite was educated at Vilnius Academy of Arts where she studied from 1984 to 1990. As early as 1984 she signed her first stage design, and since then she has been one of Lithuania'smost active and successful stage designers. From 1999 she has collaborated with one of Lithuania's most known directors, Oskaras Korsunovas, a number of times. For him she has, among other things, made the stage design for Mark Ravenhill's Shopping and fucking (1999), Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita (2000), Sophocles' Oedipus (2002), Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet (2003), and now The Road to Damascus at The National Theatre during this season. She has received a number of awards: In 1987 and in 2003 she received the Lithuanian Ministry of Culture's award for stage design for Saltenis' Duokiskis and Sophocles' Oidipos respectively, in 1994 she got the St. Christopher award for the stage design for Ingmar Bergman's Persona, and in 2004 Lithuania's national award for art and culture."

    • John Kristian Alsaker

      John-Kristian Alsaker for the stage design for Alice in Wonderland, The National Stage:

      "John-Kristian Alsaker is one of the most used - and known - freelance stage designers in the country, with a long and successful career nationally as well as internationally. He was educated in England and for several years he worked at National Theatre and Old Vic. He has been a stage designer for one or more productions at most of the theatres in the country. We may mention a bunch from the most recent years: Falstaff at The Norwegian Opera, Enigma Variations,Tater!* (Traveller) and 40 at Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre), Woyzeck and A Doll's House at The National Theatre, Fiddler on the Roof at Hålogaland Theatre, Tørres Snørtevold at Rogaland Theatre, Copenhagen at Thalia Teater, Pantagleize, Faust, Boer Boerson Jr. at The Norwegian Theatre. He has worked with film and TV (Gåten Knut Hamsun* (The Mystery of Knut Hamsun), Peer Gynt). For a number of years he was a stage designer at Los Angeles Theatre Centre, he has been awarded several critics' awards in USA, for instance did he get an Emmy for Phantom of the Opera, and in 2002 he won The Hedda Award for the stage design for Antons villfaring* (Anton's Deviation) at The Norwegian Theatre. John-Kristian Alsaker was also who was responsible for the stage design for the opening and closing ceremonies during the Lillehammer Olympics in 1994."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    Winners

    • The Road to Damascus

      "This year's winner has created a fascinating, mysterious stage design, completing and anchoring the dream-like text. The stage image is related to art installations and visual arts, while proving strong, sculptural qualities.With simple tools the stage designer shows a fairytale-like ability to conjure the most diverse fantasies. Almost without noticing we are transferred from a busy corner in a great city to a beach by the surging ocean, and the illusion hasn't been broken underway. A unique work of stage design.

      This year's award goes to Jurate Paulekaite from Lithuania for the stage design for The Road to Damascus."

    • Juratè Paulèkaitè

      "This year's winner has created a fascinating, mysterious stage design, completing and anchoring the dream-like text. The stage image is related to art installations and visual arts, while proving strong, sculptural qualities.With simple tools the stage designer shows a fairytale-like ability to conjure the most diverse fantasies. Almost without noticing we are transferred from a busy corner in a great city to a beach by the surging ocean, and the illusion hasn't been broken underway. A unique work of stage design.

      This year's award goes to Jurate Paulekaite from Lithuania for the stage design for The Road to Damascus."

    Best supporting actress

    The select excellent performance is to surpass other good performances through:

    *qualities of craft

    *artistic qualities

    *unpredictability

    The Hedda Awards 2006 were given out during a ceremony Sunday September 3 at The National Theatre.

    The actors Gjertrud Jynge and Kim Haugen hosted the show. The awards were presented by Eva Joly, Tancred Ibsen, director of Bergen International Festival Per Boye Hansen, minister of finance Kristin Halvorsen, violinist Arve Tellefsen, Knut Nærum, ombudsman for children Reidar Hjermann, actress Lise Fjeldstad, lawyer Abid Q. Raja, director Stein Roger Bull and writer Vigdis Hjorth.

    The jury consisted of IdaLou Larsen, Tom Remlov, Kristian Seltun, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Andreas Wiese.

    Nominations

    • Lise Fjeldstad

      Lise Fjeldstad for her interpretation of the elderly woman in Sleep by Jon Fosse, Amfiscenen (The Amphi Stage), The National Theatre:

      "Lise Fjeldstad graduated from The National Academy of Theatre in 1963. The same year she became an employee of The Norwegian Theatre, where she is remembered as Desdemona in Othello (1966), Ragnhild in Fellow Man (1967) and Hedda in Hedda Gabler (1971). From 1971 to 1974 she was employed at Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation's TV drama department, before returning to The Norwegian Theatre until she in 1975 started working for The National Theatre. At this theatre she has played many great roles, including Martha in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf (1988) and Mrs. Alving in Ghosts (1993). She has guest-starred at The National Stage and taken part in several outdoors spectacles, including The Saint Olav Drama at Stiklestad. Lise Fjeldstad also is a director. At The National Theatre she has been responsible for the past five productions of Journey to the Christmas Star, for The Norwegian Touring Theatre she has staged Ibsen's Lady Inger (2000) and The Hour of the Lynx by P. O. Enquist (2004). She got the Swedish film award Guldbaggen as best leading actress for the movie Little Ida, Amanda as best leading actress for Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation's The Dance of Death (1991), The Per Aabel Honorary Award (Per Aabels ærespris) in 1992, The Norwegian Critics' Award for her interpretation of Mrs. Alving (1993). Lise Fjeldstad also is a Knight of the Order of St. Olav."

    • Kirsten Hofseth

      Kirsten Hofseth for her interpretation of Magdelone in The Fussy Man by Ludvig Holberg, Store Scene (the main stage), The National Stage:

      "Kirsten Hofseth was a student at The National Academy of Theatre from 1967 to 1969. Next she was connected to Trøndelag Theatre, for which she worked until 1972, and where she had the roles of in A Midsummer Night's Dream and Ismene in Antigone. She took part in establishing Teatret Vårt (Our Theatre), and for five years she took part in all the productions at the theatre, such as the opening performance, The Comedy of Errors, The Word and Edvard Hoem's The Women by the Fjord. In 1977 she became a freelancer, and among her assignments was a role in Grenseland* (Borderland), the first Norwegian TV series. She came to Rogaland Theatre for the first time in 1978, and worked there for Kjetil Bang-Hansen's last two years as artistic director. From 1980 to 1982 she was a member of the regular ensemble of Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation's TV drama division, and in 1982 she returned to Stavanger where she stayed until 2005, the last 10-12 years with some leaves - among other things, she has visited Nordland Theatre, and she has taken part in Offshore. Among her many roles at Rogaland Theatre one may mention Hofseth in Thomas Bernhard's Worringers: Hofseth, Sandsberg and Grønli, (1989) and Ella Rentheim in John Gabriel Borkman (1992). At the time, she works for The National Stage, where she the autumn of 2005 took part in Jon Fosse's Dream of Autumn."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    • Ida Holten Worsøe

      Ida Holten Worsøe for the role of Marcela in The Dog in the Manger by Lope de Vega, Scene Øst (the eastern stage), Hålogaland Theatre:

      "Ida Holten Worsøe was educated within theatre and musical from Academy of Music and Drama in Gothenburg, where she studied from 2002 to 2005. Prior to starting there she studied a year at the dance theatre school DT-Danseteater in Copenhagen. That was 2001. She has been a ballet pedagogue, singing teacher and instructor. The autumn of 2003 she acted in Appelsinene på Fagerborg* (The Fagerborg Oranges) by Lars Saabye Christensen at Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre) and in 2004 she performed the 'one girl's' musical Sannheten om Susi* (The Truth about Susi). The latter she also directed. The autumn of 2004 she took part in Jul i Blåfjell* (Christmas in the Blue Mountain) at Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre) and the autumn of 2005 she had her first role at Hålogaland Theatre when taking part in Benoni and Rosa, the adaption of Knut Hamsun's novels, and the opening performance in the new theatre venue."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    Winners

    • Sleep

      "This year's winner started her career at The Norwegian Theatre, but came to The National Theatre in 1975. In addition to being a very versatile actress, she is also a director. She gets the award for a moving, deeply human interpretation of a role in a very powerful production of a typical ensemble piece. In an ensemble piece no role carries the action alone. But there are times when one role becomes an anchor, not at the cost of the others, but because of that one actor's particular performance.

      The award goes to Lise Fjeldstad for her portrait of the elder woman in Jon Fosse's Sleep."

    • Lise Fjeldstad

      "This year's winner started her career at The Norwegian Theatre, but came to The National Theatre in 1975. In addition to being a very versatile actress, she is also a director. She gets the award for a moving, deeply human interpretation of a role in a very powerful production of a typical ensemble piece. In an ensemble piece no role carries the action alone. But there are times when one role becomes an anchor, not at the cost of the others, but because of that one actor's particular performance.

      The award goes to Lise Fjeldstad for her portrait of the elder woman in Jon Fosse's Sleep."

    Best direction

    Best direction is to surpass other good directions through:

    *choice of style and/or style elements and how this/these are executed and adjusted to the totality of the production

    *how style and/or style elements are adjusted to and established in relation to the material the production discusses or is based on (the dramaturgy/reading)

    *innovation in style

    The Hedda Awards 2006 were given out during a ceremony Sunday September 3 at The National Theatre.

    The actors Gjertrud Jynge and Kim Haugen hosted the show. The awards were presented by Eva Joly, Tancred Ibsen, director of Bergen International Festival Per Boye Hansen, minister of finance Kristin Halvorsen, violinist Arve Tellefsen, Knut Nærum, ombudsman for children Reidar Hjermann, actress Lise Fjeldstad, lawyer Abid Q. Raja, director Stein Roger Bull and writer Vigdis Hjorth.

    The jury consisted of IdaLou Larsen, Tom Remlov, Kristian Seltun, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Andreas Wiese.

    Nominations

    • Kjersti Haugen

      Kjersti Haugen for the direction of The Dog in the Manger by Lope de Vega, Scene Øst (the eastern stage), Hålogaland Theatre:

      "Kjersti Haugen started her education at Norwegian University of Life Sciences, and ended as a nature manager writing her thesis on theatre in nature - about outdoors spectacles of many kinds. After life sciences she studied drama at Dragvoll, before she for two years taught at the non-degree granting college of Hallingdal. In 1998 and 1999 she was educated at École Internationale de Théâtre Jacques Lecoq, and next she taught at the non-degree granting college of Romerike until 2001. She was accepted at the direction study at The National Academy of Theatre, and Frank by Maria Tryti Vennerød, staged at The Norwegian Theatre, was her diploma assignment. She had formerly staged Maria Tryti Vennerød's Take Me by the Wings and The Lady at the Counter during The Norwegian Drama Festivals in 2002 and 2004. The autumn of 2005 she directed Norge, Midt-Norge* (Norway, Middle Norway) at Trøndelag Theatre."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    • Sofia Jupither

      Sofia Jupither for the direction of Sleep by Jon Fosse at Amfiscenen (The Amphi Stage), The National Theatre:

      "Sofia Jupither was born in Gothenburg, but grew up in Sollentuna outside of Stockholm. She chose the theatre direction at upper secondary school, and next she studied at Stockholm University. In 1996 she began working as a director's assistant, first at The Royal Dramatic Theatre and then for five years at Stockholm City Theatre, where she worked with directors as different as Lena Söderblom, Rikard Günther, Staffan Aspegren and Göran Stangertz. Sofia Jupither made her debut as a director with the Scandinavian opening of Jon Fosse's Visits at Helsinki City Theatre. Her Stockholm debut was also with Jon Fosse, now with The Girl on the Sofa at Stockholm City Theatre. After that she has staged The Road to Damascus by August Strindberg in a production at Stockholm City Theatre at Strindberg's Intima Teater. In 2004 she staged a play from Donald Margulies' Collected Stories – also performed at Teatret Vårt (Our Theatre) in Molde. At The Royal Dramatic Theatre's Lejonkulan she has staged Igor Bauersima's norway.today, and she completed 2004 with the world wide premiere of Utan’ (Without) by Ninna Tersman at Teater Giljotin."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Swedish title's literal meaning.

    • Victoria H. Meirik

      Victoria H. Meirik for the direction of Blackbird by David Harrower in Malersalen (The Painters Hall), The National Theatre:

      "Director Victoria Meirik was born in Norway, but has lived in Kuwait, Portugal, France and The Netherlands. She studied drama at The Academy of Creative Writing in Hordaland, theatre theory at The University of Oslo and is educated as a director at the direction study at the Amsterdam School of the Arts. After graduating she made her mark in The Netherlands where she among other things was responsible for the Dutch opening of Jon Fosse's Mother and Child at Theater Gasthuis in Amsterdam in 2001. In The Netherlands she has staged classics such as Chekhov, Sophocles, Brecht and Ibsen, and contemporary playwrights such as Marius von Mayenburg and Sarah Kane. In 2004 she directed her own play To the dogs in Amsterdam. In Norway she made her mark with her very first direction assignments, the strong and personal interpretation of Chekhov's Ivanov at Hålogaland Theatre the spring of 2004. Since then she has staged, among other things, Shakespeare's Richard III and War by Lars Norén at Rogaland Theatre. Blackbird was her first assignment at The National Theatre."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    Winners

    • Sleep

      "Nowadays, when the gender perspective is a controversial issue in Norwegian theatre, the jury is delighted to be able to nominate three women - three young women - in the best direction category. The winner has had a demanding, difficult assignment, but in collaboration with the actors and with great musicality she has found a quiet, precisely physical expression developing the playwright's intentions further. Her direction is tight, finely tuned and almost invisible, and excels with its sensitive rhythm and its distinctly feminine warmth.

      The winner of the year is Sofia Jupither for the direction of Jon Fosse's Sleep."

    • Sofia Jupither

      "Nowadays, when the gender perspective is a controversial issue in Norwegian theatre, the jury is delighted to be able to nominate three women - three young women - in the best direction category. The winner has had a demanding, difficult assignment, but in collaboration with the actors and with great musicality she has found a quiet, precisely physical expression developing the playwright's intentions further. Her direction is tight, finely tuned and almost invisible, and excels with its sensitive rhythm and its distinctly feminine warmth.

      The winner of the year is Sofia Jupither for the direction of Jon Fosse's Sleep."

    Best production for children and youth

    The best production for children and youth is to surpass other productions for children and youth in:

    *quality based on the character of theatre, in choice of style elements and dramaturgy

    *communication with the target group

    *choice of material.

    The Hedda Awards 2006 were given out during a ceremony Sunday September 3 at The National Theatre.

    The actors Gjertrud Jynge and Kim Haugen hosted the show. The awards were presented by Eva Joly, Tancred Ibsen, director of Bergen International Festival Per Boye Hansen, minister of finance Kristin Halvorsen, violinist Arve Tellefsen, Knut Nærum, ombudsman for children Reidar Hjermann, actress Lise Fjeldstad, lawyer Abid Q. Raja, director Stein Roger Bull and writer Vigdis Hjorth.

    The jury consisted of IdaLou Larsen, Tom Remlov, Kristian Seltun, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Andreas Wiese.

    Nominations

    • Det er sikkert og visst* (That is certain for sure)

      Det er sikkert og visst* (That is certain for sure), directed by Lisbeth Lindblad Knopper (SIC), Hålogaland Theatre:

      "...so good I would like to recommend it wildly and without limitations to everyone who is or has been a child. Like that. Now THAT is said."

      Erling Steenstrup, Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation

      "...a very successful tribute to the great poet of Denmark, and a charming key to his poetic, yet down-to-earth universe."

      IdaLou Larsen scenekunst.no

      "...we could only thank and bow for a delightful theatre experience, also for us with some year behind us."

      Bjørn H. Larssen, Nordlys

      "...a coherent, funny and cute performance hitting home with the small ones and the big ones."

      Helge Matland, Tromsø

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

      SIC:

      Lisbeth Lindblad Knopperwrote the script, and Marianne Andreasen directed it.

    • Pippi Longstocking

      Pippi Longstocking, directed by Marit Moum Aune with Henriette Steenstrup in the title role, The National Theatre:

      "Astrid Lindgren's Pippi Longstocking has turned 60 years, and is celebrated at The National Theatre's main stage in a performance that is beautiful to the eye, musically spreading joy and near abundant with energy."

      Mona Levin, Aftenposten

      "A human Pippi... In every way it is an impressive Pippi Longstocking The National Theatre has made. Not least is it delightful to meet Henriette Steenstrup as Astrid Lindgren's very best known heroine."

      IdaLou Larsen, scenekunst.no

      "...the vulnerability of the otherwise strong Pippi character is highlighted, a girl with a mother in heaven and a father on pirate adventures gets the room to be lonely and vulnerable as directed by Marit Moum Aune. The outsider is strong, but being different has its price. This is a dangerous balance, but it keeps up."

      Andreas Wiese, Dagbladet

    • Prince of the Trolls

      Prince of the Trolls, directed by Sverre Waage, The Norwegian Theatre:

      "The Norwegian Theatre is not known for a daring, innovative line in theatre for children, but this time the theatre dares to go for it to the max, and what a success performance it has become!"

      Jon-Harald Thorsås, Kulturspeilet

      "It has become a sweepingly fine performance, really for the entire family. All ages will find something to rejoice in. Perhaps each in their way. But together."

      IdaLou Larsen, scenekunst.no

      "...a success. And one of the reasons (...) is that the theatre has dared to emphasise new, Norwegian theatre for children. Here is new music, and an orchestra onstage. Acrobats and circus artists have been hired among the best in the world. The result is a highly successful compilation of circus and acrobatics, music and fairytale. This is a performance children can love and adults can love to see with them."

      Andreas Wiese, Dagbladet

    Winners

    • The Norwegian Theatre

      "It is important that good, untraditional productions for children and youth are made. But the jury did not find enough worthy candidates for the award last year, not the year before the last, and the awards were not given out. This year the jury has nominated three very different, but as exciting productions, and the winner is a sweepingly grand performance, bringing new elements to the theatre. A fairytale for the whole family, in which audience members of all ages could find something to delight in. Perhaps each in their way. But together.

      This year's winner is Prince of the Trolls by Sverre Waage at The Norwegian Theatre."

    • Prince of the Trolls

      "It is important that good, untraditional productions for children and youth are made. But the jury did not find enough worthy candidates for the award last year, not the year before the last, and the awards were not given out. This year the jury has nominated three very different, but as exciting productions, and the winner is a sweepingly grand performance, bringing new elements to the theatre. A fairytale for the whole family, in which audience members of all ages could find something to delight in. Perhaps each in their way. But together.

      This year's winner is Prince of the Trolls by Sverre Waage at The Norwegian Theatre."

    • Sverre Waage

      "It is important that good, untraditional productions for children and youth are made. But the jury did not find enough worthy candidates for the award last year, not the year before the last, and the awards were not given out. This year the jury has nominated three very different, but as exciting productions, and the winner is a sweepingly grand performance, bringing new elements to the theatre. A fairytale for the whole family, in which audience members of all ages could find something to delight in. Perhaps each in their way. But together.

      This year's winner is Prince of the Trolls by Sverre Waage at The Norwegian Theatre."

    Special artistic achievement

    No nomination is announced.

    The criteria are open.

    The Hedda Awards 2006 were given out during a ceremony Sunday September 3 at The National Theatre.

    The actors Gjertrud Jynge and Kim Haugen hosted the show. The awards were presented by Eva Joly, Tancred Ibsen, director of Bergen International Festival Per Boye Hansen, minister of finance Kristin Halvorsen, violinist Arve Tellefsen, Knut Nærum, ombudsman for children Reidar Hjermann, actress Lise Fjeldstad, lawyer Abid Q. Raja, director Stein Roger Bull and writer Vigdis Hjorth.

    The jury consisted of IdaLou Larsen, Tom Remlov, Kristian Seltun, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Andreas Wiese.

    Winners

    • Sogn og Fjordane Theatre

      "The special artistic achievement award provides the jury with an opportunity to honour efforts not covered by the other nine categories. For instance the award has gone to puppet designer Lisbeth Narud, playwright Jesper Halle and - last year - the entire staff of Rogaland Theatre. This year's award goes to a theatre which, in using an actual event, shaking the region, has created a contemporary, provoking production engaging way beyond the county borders.

      The special artistic achievement award goes to Sogn og Fjordane Theatre (SoFT) for research-based teamwork and production of Saman skal vi leve* (We are to live together)."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    • Saman skal vi leve* (We are to live together)

      "The special artistic achievement award provides the jury with an opportunity to honour efforts not covered by the other nine categories. For instance the award has gone to puppet designer Lisbeth Narud, playwright Jesper Halle and - last year - the entire staff of Rogaland Theatre. This year's award goes to a theatre which, in using an actual event, shaking the region, has created a contemporary, provoking production engaging way beyond the county borders.

      The special artistic achievement award goes to Sogn og Fjordane Theatre (SoFT) for research-based teamwork and production of Saman skal vi leve* (We are to live together)."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    Debut of the year

    In this category the jury announces no nominations.

    The criteria are open.

    The Hedda Awards 2006 were given out during a ceremony Sunday September 3 at The National Theatre.

    The actors Gjertrud Jynge and Kim Haugen hosted the show. The awards were presented by Eva Joly, Tancred Ibsen, director of Bergen International Festival Per Boye Hansen, minister of finance Kristin Halvorsen, violinist Arve Tellefsen, Knut Nærum, ombudsman for children Reidar Hjermann, actress Lise Fjeldstad, lawyer Abid Q. Raja, director Stein Roger Bull and writer Vigdis Hjorth.

    The jury consisted of IdaLou Larsen, Tom Remlov, Kristian Seltun, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Andreas Wiese.

    Winners

    • Erlend Sandem

      "The Hedda grant, or the debut of the year award, is given out for the fourth time this year, and for the second time it goes to a playwright. Different from the first award winner, Bjørnar Teigen, who was also an actor, this year's winner is simply just a playwright. A very promising one as such, as he already masters his craft and the difficult art of writing lines. Two of his plays have been produced during the past season, and the jury eagerly anticipates the next work from his hand.

      The award goes to Erlend Sandem for Down the Sun and Barcodes."