The Hedda Award 2003

Production of the year

The theatre production of the year is to surpass other productions through:

*current interest.

*format.

*context/event.

Nominations

  • The Full Monty

    The Full Monty by Terrence McNally/David Yazbek, The National Stage:

    Directed and choreographed by: Runar Borge
    Stage design: Bengt Fröderberg
    Translator, instructor and choreographer: Runar Borge

    Costume designer: William

    Musical direction: Jan Kåre Hystad

    Masks: Mette Noodt

    Sound designer: Bjarte Våge

    Lighting designer: Sverre Randin

    With Monica Hjelle, Espen Hana. Dagfinn Lyngbø, Bjarte Ylvisaker/Preben Nyløkken, Marianne Nielsen, Aril Martinsen, Tonja S. Sanborn, Jon Bleiklie Devik, Tore Chr. Sævold, Kim Fairchild, Richard K. Sseruwagi, Kim Kalsås, Espen Grjotheim, Yvonne Algrøy, Oddrun Valestrand, Cathrine Bang, Lars Jacobsen, Kai Taule

    "The Full Monty has all you can wish for in a showy, quick, rhythmic, colour-sparkling and funny musical."

    Sidsel Hamre Dagsland, Bergens Tidende

  • Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

    Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? by Edward Albee, Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre):

    Translated by: Svein Sturla Hungnes

    With Anne Krigsvoll, Dennis Storhøi, Trine Wiggen, Nicolai Cleve Broch

    Directed by: Svein Sturla Hungnes

    Stage design: Birgitte Lie

    Costumes: Trude Bergh

    Lighting: Øyvind Wangensteen             

    Masks: Jill Tonje Holter

  • The Dance of Death

    The Dance of Death by August Strindberg, Hålogaland Theatre:

    Translated into Northern Norwegian by: Ragnar Olsen

    With: Guri Johnson, Håkon Ramstad and Bjørn Sundquist
    Directed by: Tyra Tønnessen
    Stage design: Bård Thorbjørnsen
    Costume: Ane Aasheim
    Sound design: Jon Paulsen
    Sound: Tor Vadseth

    "Bjørn Sundquist and Guri Johnson manage to create an uncomfortable credibility and a nerve pinning you - sweating - to the chair."

    Lasse Jangås, Nordlys.

Winners

  • Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre)

    "The production of the year was seen by close to 30 000 spectators, and during its run there was actually not a single seat available. The production was the event of the autumn. This was deserved. Without ever working against the text, the director grabbed hold of one of the most well-known dramas of our age, freed it from clichés and conventions, and managed to enlarge the originally simple and tormenting conflicts so that they also dealt with the perverted, destructive game between man and woman. Through excellent interaction the actors of the productions, each in their way contributed to making a tragic, drunken and madcap afterparty into disturbingly good theatre.

    The winner of the year is Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? at Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre), directed by Svein Sturla Hungnes, with Anne Krigsvoll, Dennis Storhøi, Nicolai Cleve Broch and Trine Wiggen in the roles."

  • Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

    "The production of the year was seen by close to 30 000 spectators, and during its run there was actually not a single seat available. The production was the event of the autumn. This was deserved. Without ever working against the text, the director grabbed hold of one of the most well-known dramas of our age, freed it from clichés and conventions, and managed to enlarge the originally simple and tormenting conflicts so that they also dealt with the perverted, destructive game between man and woman. Through excellent interaction the actors of the productions, each in their way contributed to making a tragic, drunken and madcap afterparty into disturbingly good theatre.

    The winner of the year is Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? at Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre), directed by Svein Sturla Hungnes, with Anne Krigsvoll, Dennis Storhøi, Nicolai Cleve Broch and Trine Wiggen in the roles."

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    Best visual design

    The best visual design is to surpass other good works through:

    *conceptual autonomy (that the stage design is an artistic work in itself) balanced with conceptual function (the dramaturgic dimensions of the room).

    *relation to related art forms (visual art, design, architecture).

    *innovation, in particular related to stage design/the profession of theatre and related art forms.

    Nominations

    • Kari Gravklev

      Kari Gravklev for the stage design for The Song of the Say-Sayer by Daniel Danis at The Norwegian Theatre:

      "Kari Gravklev began her career at Hålogaland Theatre, where she worked from 1973 to 1979. Today she is among our most known, most renown and used stage designers. She has had assignments at approximately all the Norwegian theatre institutions, but has also worked for independent companies, film and TV. Not to talk about the opening ceremony during the Lillehammer Olympics.

      This autumn she has already found the time to make her mark upon two of the season's most important and highly diverse productions: The Seagull at The Norwegian Theatre and Winter Storage at The National Theatre's Amphi stage (Amfiscenen). One classic and one contemporary drama, a large stage and a small one: Kari Gravklev is a versatile artist."

    • Yngvar Julin

      Yngvar Julin for the stage design for The Flood by Tom Remlov/Jonny Halberg at Ibsen Theatre:

      "Yngvar Julin is an architect, educated at The Oslo School of Architecture and Design and University of East London. He is still active as an architect, though he for the time being is extremely busy as a stage designer.

      This autumn he has been responsible for the stage design for The Wish or Loftur the Sorcerer at Sogn og Fjordane Theatre, where he in 2000 signed the Hedda-nominated stage design for Helge Ingstad's The Last Boat, but also Jeppe of the Hill at Ibsen Theatre. In addition he has found the time for the stage design for the world premiere of !Bang Productions' Pippi/A Girl at The Open Theatre (Det Åpne Teater) this week."

    • Bård Lie Thorbjørnsen

      Bård Lie Thorbjørnsen for the stage design for The Dance of Death by August Strindberg at Hålogaland Theatre:

      "As part of his thesis at The National Academy of Craft and Art Industry, Bård Lie Thorbjørnsen in 2000-2001 was assigned the responsibility for the stage design for three theatre productions: The Glass Menagerie at The National Academy of Theatre, The Belgrade Trilogy at The Norwegian Theatre and Mother Courage at Trøndelag Theatre. In particular the latter was noticed, and thanks to that he was actually nominated for The Hedda Award before he was - completely - finished with his education.

      Last year he signed the stage design for two very successful projects - Undset, a project in collaboration between The Norwegian Touring Theatre and The National Theatre, and The Dance of Death at Hålogaland Theatre, for which he is nominated. This autumn he has made the stage design for yet another great success: Bikubesong* (Song of the Beehives) at The Norwegian Theatre."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    Winners

    • The Song of the Say-Sayer

      "This year's Hedda Award for best stage design goes to a versatile artist, working as naturally with the classic and the modern drama. The award winner's style is characterised by an analytic approach to the material, and a brave, varied stage design expression.

      Last season the award winner created a stage design with a metaphoric visual expression, making it into a modern and complex narrative. The stage design was simple, took part in the creation, it was ambiguous and beautiful. We could also see an architectonical unity made up by the auditorium and the stage. The best stage design award this year goes to one of our leading stage designers. She continuously celebrates triumphs, nationally as well as internationally.

      Kari Gravklev!!"

    • Kari Gravklev

      "This year's Hedda Award for best stage design goes to a versatile artist, working as naturally with the classic and the modern drama. The award winner's style is characterised by an analytic approach to the material, and a brave, varied stage design expression.

      Last season the award winner created a stage design with a metaphoric visual expression, making it into a modern and complex narrative. The stage design was simple, took part in the creation, it was ambiguous and beautiful. We could also see an architectonical unity made up by the auditorium and the stage. The best stage design award this year goes to one of our leading stage designers. She continuously celebrates triumphs, nationally as well as internationally.

      Kari Gravklev!!"

    Best production for children and youth

    The best production for children and youth is to surpass other productions for children and youth in:

    *quality based on the character of theatre, in choice of style elements and dramaturgy

    *communication with the target group

    *choice of material.

    Nominations

    • Dustefjerten og andungen* (The Dork Fart and the Duck Chick)

      Dustefjerten og andungen* (The Dork Fart and the Duck Chick) by Rune Belsvik. Directed by Line Rosvoll, The Norwegian Theatre, Scene 2 (Stage 2):

      "At the great theatre institutions children and youth usually experience theatre from the main stages. Only rarely children get the opportunity to enjoy another important kind of theatre, the close and intimate of the smaller venues - and perhaps also a play one has not seen before. Because of this, it is a joy that The Norwegian Theatre this spring chose to stage Dustefjerten og Andungen* (The Dork Fart and the Duck Chick)."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    • Three Mothers

      Three Mothers by Dansdesign, part of Arts Council Norway's project Glitterbird, with art for the youngest:

      "Three Mothers is totally unusual theatre - a production made for a totally unusual audience, children who have not yet reached the age of three years. And the performance achieves amazing contact with the target group."

    • The Brothers Lionheart

      The Brothers Lionheart by Astrid Lindgren. Directed by: Alexander Mørk-Eidem, The National Theatre, the main stage:

      "The eventually constantly more exciting director Alexander Mørk-Eidem has created a unified, effectual and grand theatre production, almost without a flaw. (...) Great theatre this is anyway."

      Bengt Calmeyer in Dagsavisen

    Winners

    • Dancedesign

      "This year's best production for children and youth is one that meets its audience extraordinarily well. The artists behind it have long experience from Norwegian performing arts and have put several prestigious projects behind them. The work is characterised by a distinct style, in which the visual and the movement are central.

      This they have taken advantage of to the full, and through that they have created a production which in a formidable way captures the attention of an audience group who is not usually given many performing arts experiences, that is, the very youngest - those in the age group from zero to three years old.

      The best production for children and youth award goes to Anne Grete Eriksen and Leif Hernes in Dansdesign, for the production Three Mothers."

    • Three Mothers

      "This year's best production for children and youth is one that meets its audience extraordinarily well. The artists behind it have long experience from Norwegian performing arts and have put several prestigious projects behind them. The work is characterised by a distinct style, in which the visual and the movement are central.

      This they have taken advantage of to the full, and through that they have created a production which in a formidable way captures the attention of an audience group who is not usually given many performing arts experiences, that is, the very youngest - those in the age group from zero to three years old.

      The best production for children and youth award goes to Anne Grete Eriksen and Leif Hernes in Dansdesign, for the production Three Mothers."

    • Leif Hernes

      "This year's best production for children and youth is one that meets its audience extraordinarily well. The artists behind it have long experience from Norwegian performing arts and have put several prestigious projects behind them. The work is characterised by a distinct style, in which the visual and the movement are central.

      This they have taken advantage of to the full, and through that they have created a production which in a formidable way captures the attention of an audience group who is not usually given many performing arts experiences, that is, the very youngest - those in the age group from zero to three years old.

      The best production for children and youth award goes to Anne Grete Eriksen and Leif Hernes in Dansdesign, for the production Three Mothers."

    • Anne Grete Eriksen

      "This year's best production for children and youth is one that meets its audience extraordinarily well. The artists behind it have long experience from Norwegian performing arts and have put several prestigious projects behind them. The work is characterised by a distinct style, in which the visual and the movement are central.

      This they have taken advantage of to the full, and through that they have created a production which in a formidable way captures the attention of an audience group who is not usually given many performing arts experiences, that is, the very youngest - those in the age group from zero to three years old.

      The best production for children and youth award goes to Anne Grete Eriksen and Leif Hernes in Dansdesign, for the production Three Mothers."

    Debut of the year

    In this category the jury announces no nominations.

    The criteria are open.

    Winners

    • Det tredje tegnet* (The Third Sign)

      "The Hedda Grant is new this year, and is given to an artist with a debut within one of the many different artistic disciplines of the theatre. It is meant to point towards the future, and to encourage further artistic efforts in the years to come. Paradoxically the first recipient of the Hedda Grant is an experienced theatre worker already.

      Paradoxically, because the grant goes to a person making his debut. He is educated as an actor, but has made his debut as a playwright with a play for an age group the theatre rarely communicates directly with, those aged 11 to 14, and it is sad that such a distinct, dramatic universe as this debut work represents was not covered by national media. The winner has written a funny, poetic and philosophic play about young people on the threshold between childhood and youth.

      The Hedda Grant of the year goes to Bjørnar Teigen for the play Det tredje tegnet* (The Third Sign), with its world premiere at Teatret Vårt (Our Theatre), directed by the playwright."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    • Bjørnar Lisether Teigen

      "The Hedda Grant is new this year, and is given to an artist with a debut within one of the many different artistic disciplines of the theatre. It is meant to point towards the future, and to encourage further artistic efforts in the years to come. Paradoxically the first recipient of the Hedda Grant is an experienced theatre worker already.

      Paradoxically, because the grant goes to a person making his debut. He is educated as an actor, but has made his debut as a playwright with a play for an age group the theatre rarely communicates directly with, those aged 11 to 14, and it is sad that such a distinct, dramatic universe as this debut work represents was not covered by national media. The winner has written a funny, poetic and philosophic play about young people on the threshold between childhood and youth.

      The Hedda Grant of the year goes to Bjørnar Teigen for the play Det tredje tegnet* (The Third Sign), with its world premiere at Teatret Vårt (Our Theatre), directed by the playwright."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    Honorary Hedda

    In this category the jury announces no nominations.

    The criteria are open.

    Winners

    • Jon Fosse

      "Last year Honorary Hedda was given out for the very first time - to Wenche Foss. And Honorary Hedda is not to be given out every year. Only when the jury simply can't avoid it. That was how it was last year. That is how it is this year.

      The winner of Honorary Hedda is a creating artist, he is a writer, and his writing is diverse - novels, short stories, texts, books for children, essays, poetry and plays. To the joy of everyone who loves theatre, it is mostly as a playwright he has gotten a name. His intense, poetic universe has not just conquered Norway, but all of Europe.

      This Honorary Hedda winner of the year is Jon Fosse."

    Particularly excellent performance

    The particularly excellent performance is to surpass other good performances through:

    *qualities of craft.

    *artistic qualities.

    *unpredictability.

    Nominations

    • Laila Goody

      Laila Goody, for the role of Cathrine in Proof by David Auburn, directed by Kjetil Bang-Hansen, at Trøndelag Theatre:

      "Laila Goody graduated from The National Academy of Theatre in 1994, and has been an employee of The National Theatre since then. She has also been a member of the theatre's Torshov company. Ever since her debut she has made herself positively remarked in a number of roles, and her range is wide: This spring she visited Trøndelag Theatre, and this autumn she interprets the 'double person' of Shen Te/Shui Ta in The Good Person of Szechwan by Bertolt Brecht.

      She has taken part in a number of movies, most recently in the success Johnny Vang, and she is known from Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation's radio drama division. She has won a number of awards; Gösta Ekman's memorial award in 1997, The Narvesen Culture Prize in 1998, The Per Aabel Honorary Award (Per Aabels Ærespris) in 2001 and the radio theatre award Blå Fugl (literally: Blue Bird) in 2002. She was also nominated for The Hedda Award in the particularly excellent performance category last year, at the time for her interpretation of Eleonora in Strindberg's Easter."

    • Anne Marit Jacobsen

      Anne Marit Jacobsen, for the role of Lady Bracknell in The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde, directed by Kjetil Bang-Hansen, at The National Theatre, the main stage:

      "Anne Marit Jacobsen has been connected to The National Theatre from 1969, and has acted in classics and contemporary drama, comedy and tragedy. Her range is wide, and the audience has loved her worn-out housewife in the monologue Shirley Valentine, which has often saved The National Theatre when the audience has let other productions down.

      Nor has she stuck to honourable The National Theatre. She has taken part in crazy farces at Chateau Neuf, and for the time being she is on a leave from The National Theatre, operating as one of the fundamental forces in the revue På nett med byen* (In tune with town). As it is, she is a great revue artist, and not least her imitations of Gro (Harlem Brundtland, Sceneweb's comment) are unparalleled. It doesn't stop there: This autumn the versatile lady also makes her debut as a writer! In 1997 she received The Per Aabel Honorary Award (Per Aabels Ærespris), and this spring she shared the award of Aase Bye with Kim Haugen - precisely for the participation in The Importance of Being Earnest."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    • Dennis Storhøi

      Dennis Storhøi, for the role of George in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, by Edward Albee, directed by Svein Sturla Hungnes, Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre):

      "Dennis Storhøi graduated from The National Academy of Theatre in 1985, and after working for The National Stage, Rogaland Theatre and ABC-teatret he came to Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre) in 1991. At the theatre he has played the title role of Pal Joey, and taken part in a number of the theatre's productions, including Hamlet, Elling and Kjell Bjarne and Arne Berggren's 40.

      After taking critics and audiences by storm with his interpretation of George in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? he was a luscious, humorous Doolittle in My Fair Lady this spring, whereas he this autumn is the elegant Englishman of the 1930es in Noel Coward's Private Lives. He has also taken part in several movies and in TV entertainment, as well as series such as Western Wind. This autumn he got The Norwegian Critics' Award for the role of George in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?."

    Winners

    • Proof

      "It may be hard to explain what separates the great actor from the very competent one - but it is connected to the rare ability of seemingly effortlessly blowing life into, defend and be one with the most diverse stage personalities, so that the pure angels as well as the darkest of crooks onstage step forward as nuanced, complex beings.

      This ability the winner of the year has, and in her years working for Norwegian theatres she has proved that she is able to master the full range of roles. She may also have a special affinity for something as rare as young mathematics geniuses: The role of Thomasina Coverley in Tom Stoppard's Arcadia was her breakthrough in 1994. Now she gets The Hedda Award for her interpretation of another brilliant mathematician, Cathrine, in American David Auburn's Proof, staged by Trøndelag Theatre this spring.

      Thus the winner is: Laila Goody."

    • Laila Goody

      "It may be hard to explain what separates the great actor from the very competent one - but it is connected to the rare ability of seemingly effortlessly blowing life into, defend and be one with the most diverse stage personalities, so that the pure angels as well as the darkest of crooks onstage step forward as nuanced, complex beings.

      This ability the winner of the year has, and in her years working for Norwegian theatres she has proved that she is able to master the full range of roles. She may also have a special affinity for something as rare as young mathematics geniuses: The role of Thomasina Coverley in Tom Stoppard's Arcadia was her breakthrough in 1994. Now she gets The Hedda Award for her interpretation of another brilliant mathematician, Cathrine, in American David Auburn's Proof, staged by Trøndelag Theatre this spring.

      Thus the winner is: Laila Goody."

    Best direction

    Best direction is to surpass other good directions through:

    *choice of style and/or style elements and how this/these are executed and adjusted to the totality of the production.

    *how style and/or style elements are adjusted to and established in relation to the material the production discusses or is based on (the dramaturgy/reading).

    *innovation in style.

    Nominations

    • Kjetil Bang-Hansen

      Kjetil Bang-Hansen for The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde at The National Theatre:

      "Ever since he in 1962 graduated from The National Academy of Theatre, Kjetil Bang-Hansen has been a central mover in Norwegian theatre. Today he is steadily employed as an instructor and artistic counsellor at The National Theatre, where he this autumn delights audiences with two excellent, but very different productions, The Celebration and The Animals in the Hunchback Wood.

      He started his theatre career as an actor and instructor at different Norwegian theatres, and he has been the dean of The National Academy of Theatre, as well as the artistic director and CEO of several of our major venues: Rogaland Theatre, The National Stage, The National Theatre and Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre). Kjetil Bang-Hansen has directed productions at most Norwegian theatres, as well as visiting as a director in Poland, Denmark, France and USA."

    • Oskaras Koršunovas

      Oskaras Koršunovas for Winter by Jon Fosse at The Torshov Theatre:

      "Oskaras Koršunovas is from Lithuania, and was born in Vilnius in 1969. As early as when he was 20 years, he was given the responsibility for the first of his many productions at the Lithuanian national theatre, and with support from the Lithuanian ministry of culture he founded his own company in 1999.

      He has been visiting Norway, Poland, Sweden and Berlin as an instructor, and visited The Torshov Theatre for the first time in 2001. At the time he staged We Are Not Cookies. This autumn his version of Sarah Kane's Cleansed premiered at Elverket, one of the satellite venues of The Royal Dramatic Theatre."

    • Jon Tombre

      Jon Tombre for The Flood by Tom Remlov/Jonny Halberg at Ibsen Theatre:

      "Jon Tombre has worked with theatre for a long time. In 1990 he started the independent company Det Motsatte Prosjekt and in 1991 he was accepted as a student at The National Academy of Theatre's direction study. Jon Tombre is one of the very few directors who work inside as well as outside (the institutions, Sceneweb's addition).

      He has held onto Det Motsatte Prosjekt, though it has now been renamed Tombre (DMP), and his most recent production with the company, for now, was Aktuell Rapport* (Contemporary Report), performed at Black Box Teater last year. But he has also had direction assignments for The National Theatre, The Norwegian Theatre, Hålogaland Theatre, Sogn og Fjordane Theatre and Ibsen Theatre, among others. This autumn he was one of the three directors behind the project 24 Unsuccessful Norwegians."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    Winners

    • The Importance of Being Earnest

      "The winner of the year is a smart veteran, knowing Norwegian theatre from different positions, but for the audience he may be best known as a director. In this field the career of the winner has a wide scope - from classics to contemporary drama, from the deep-drilling to the feather-light. But what always characterises the work of the winner is insight and precision, a style-sure sense for details and an unparalleled feeling for the rhythm of the performance. The winner gets the award for a firework of a production. Light and bubbly like sparkling champagne, while being elegantly and strictly controlled, making sparks fly from the lines.

      Whether or not everyone has understood it now, the winner of the year is Kjetil Bang-Hansen and he gets the award for The Importance of Being Earnest at The National Theatre."

    • Kjetil Bang-Hansen

      "The winner of the year is a smart veteran, knowing Norwegian theatre from different positions, but for the audience he may be best known as a director. In this field the career of the winner has a wide scope - from classics to contemporary drama, from the deep-drilling to the feather-light. But what always characterises the work of the winner is insight and precision, a style-sure sense for details and an unparalleled feeling for the rhythm of the performance. The winner gets the award for a firework of a production. Light and bubbly like sparkling champagne, while being elegantly and strictly controlled, making sparks fly from the lines.

      Whether or not everyone has understood it now, the winner of the year is Kjetil Bang-Hansen and he gets the award for The Importance of Being Earnest at The National Theatre."