Bollywood Ibsen: The Lady from the Indian Sea

Bollywood Ibsen: The Lady from the Indian Sea (2006) was a theatre production by Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre), a Bollywood version of the play The Lady from the Sea by Henrik Ibsen. The production was performed in the theatre's venue Centralteatret.

Erik Ulfsby directed it.

Lavleen Kaur interpreted the role of the adult Ellida Wangel, in this version called Ekanta Warma, whereas Navreet Kaur acted in the role of a younger version of the same character.

Bollywood Ibsen by Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre) won The Hedda Award 2006 in the theatre project of the year category.

Information

(Objekt ID 21584)
Object type Production
Premiere March 24, 2006
Produced by Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre)
Based on The Lady from the Sea by Henrik Ibsen
Audience Adults
Language Norwegian
Expressions Drama, Theatre, Musical theatre
Running period March 24, 2006  

Requirements to venue

Blackout Yes
More

The Hedda Jury gave the following reason:

"The criteria for The Hedda Award demands that the theatre project of the year, formerly called the production of the year, is to surpass other good productions through being contemporary, and an event in itself. Preferably the production is also to be original in form.

The winner of the year satisfies all these demands. It is splendidly exotic and entirely different, it is characterised by playful, but utterly conscious direction, amazing stage design and good acting. At the same time it grants the playwright's text justice, and it builds a highly necessary bridge between the theatre and our new citizens.

The winner of the year is Bollywood Ibsen - The Lady from the Indian Sea."

Source:

Sceneweb, sceneweb.no, 11.10.2012, http://sceneweb.no/nb/awarding/23836/Heddaprisen_2006-2006

Performance dates
March 24, 2006Oslo Nye Centralteatret – Worldwide premiere
Press coverage

Elisabeth Rygg, date unknown, Aftenposten:
"This has become Ibsen as bubbling, Indian melodrama…an experience spreading joy. That the performance is highly vital and that one leaves the little theatre in the street of Akersgata with the liberating, good feeling of having seen a new and different Ibsen."

Andreas Wiese, date unknown, Dagbladet:
"If Henrik Ibsen rotates in his grave today, he does it in tune with Bollywood tunes... this is a part of Norway it feels good to see on a Norwegian theatre stage."

Jon-Harald Thorsås, date unknown, Kulturspeilet:
"I wonder if not Ibsen, 100 years after his death, laughs a little in his grave, enjoying the rhythms from Centralteatret. Ibsen has all possible reasons to be proud... a very successful project. Multicultural theatre is important as well as just, but the fun thing is that quality is so high."