Peer Gynt

Peer Gynt (1892) was a theatre production by Christiania Theatre, based on the play by Henrik Ibsen.

Bjørn Bjørnson directed it. He also interpreted the title role.

Information

(Objekt ID 52499)
Object type Production
Premiere March 8, 1892
Produced by Christiania Theatre
Based on Peer Gynt by Henrik Ibsen
Audience Adults
Number of events 50
Language Norwegian
Expressions Theatre, Drama
Running period March 9, 1892  —  June 7, 1893
Website Nasjonalbiblioteket

Requirements to venue

Blackout No
More

SOURCE:

The National Library of Norway, ibsen.nb.no, 12.01.2016, http://ibsen.nb.no/id/24178

Other participants
Performance dates
March 8, 1892Christiania Theater – Opening night
Press coverage

Writer and title unknown, Dagbladet, March 10 1892:

"In particular, it was in Mr. Bjørn Bjørnson's rendition of Per (SIC) Gynt himself, that the characterisation and interpretation at times became too external. I completely agree that his efforts were thoroughly competent, and that Christiania Theatre for the time being has no actor who could give a better Per (SIC) Gynt than him. But just this competence in her performance with the many straight-out excellent singularities brought us to demand a deeper penetration into the character, a more sincere appropriation of the human."

Writer and title unknown, Aftenposten, March 10 1892:

"On the whole Bjørnson delivers - what one should also expect from such an energetic and intelligent actor as him - a credible image of the main character in this masterpiece of Ibsen's. There is life in his acting, paired with youthful spryness, warmth and sincerity. Mrs. Dybwad gave a sympathetic Solveig; in particular, her silent acting in the first act had effect. The fellow actors contributed also to a good ensemble through good acting. The main praise, though, belongs to Miss Parelius as Aase. Her splendid acting is the main thing to fill the first act with the needed juice and power, making the scene in front of the cottage after the auction so moving, giving justice to the beautiful final scene of the third act. Bjørnson also reached his peaks in his scenes with Aase."