The Hedda Award 2008

Best supporting actress

The select excellent performance is to surpass other good performances through:

*qualities of craft

*artistic qualities

*unpredictability

The Hedda Awards 2008 were given out August 17 during a ceremony at Rogaland Theatre in Stavanger.

The jury consisted of Thoralf Berg, IdaLou Larsen, Astrid Sletbakk, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Kristian Lykkeslet Strømskag.

Nominations

  • Gisken Armand

    Gisken Armand for the role of the lawyer Voltore in Volpone by Ben Jonson, directed by Runar Hodne, The National Theatre, The Torshov Theatre:

    "Gisken Armand made her debut at the age of 14 at The National Stage, but waited until 1988 to start her career at The National Theatre, where she played Sonja in Journey to the Christmas Star the same autumn. Four years later she was the witch daughter, a role she repeated in 2000. In 1990 she played Hilde in The Lady from the Sea, while she had the role of the Lady herself in 2000. She has interpreted so many interesting and different female characters there is only room to mention a few: Nora in A Doll's House, Hilde Wangel in The Master Builder, the woman in Someone is Going to Comee, the title role of Medea, Olga in Three Sisters, and Rebecca in Ashes to Ashes. She has also acted in several movies, and received a number of awards: Gösta Ekman's memorial award in 1992, the audio book award Årets lydbokstemme (literally: The audio book voice of the year) in 2003, The National Theatre's friend association's honorary award and Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation's radio theatre award Blå fugl (The Blue Bird) in 2006 for her interpretation of Irene in Henrik Ibsen's When We Dead Awaken."

  • Marianne Krogh

    Marianne Krogh for the role of Sebjørn's wife in Turn Me on, Dammit by Olaug Nilssen, directed by Marit Moum Aune, The Norwegian Theatre:

    "Marianne Krogh came to The Norwegian Theatre as an acting student. She continued working for the same theatre as an actress, with roles including Hedvig in The Wild Duck in 1982. From 1984 to 1987 she worked for Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation's drama division, and in 1987 she got The Amanda Award for the role of Arlene in Getting Out by Marsha Norman. From 1985 to 1995 she was a member of the independent theatre company Lilith where she performed contemporary drama such as Tiden mellom tidene* (The Time between Times) and Barock Friise* (Baroque Frieze) by Cecilie Løveid. She also took part in Mater Nexus, a collaboration project between The Norwegian Theatre and The Open Theatre (Det Åpne Teater), in the project called Utan Filter (literally: No Filter) in The Norwegian Theatre's Rehearsal Venue, and has also played Anna in The Human Circle 3:1 (1999), Lilly in Bikubesong* (Song of the Beehives) (2003), Karin in Taus musikk* (Mute Music) (2004), Hege in Down to Sun (2006), Anna in Shadow of a boy by Lygre (2006)."

    *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

  • Mari Maurstad

    Mari Maurstad for the role of Miss Lamont in Singin' in the rain, directed by Svein Sturla Hungnes, Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre):

    "Mari Maurstad has been an employee of The National Theatre's since 1981, and there she has interpreted circa 50 roles, including Adela in The House of Bernarda Alba, Polly in The Three Penny Opera, and Death in The Nightingale. She has also had parts in revues and musicals at different theatres, playing Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady, Val in A Chorus Line, Kate in Kiss me Kate. For years she has had central roles in the outdoors production of Peer Gynt by the water Gålåvatnet, and she has written and produced her own solo shows, including Maris glade Mariritt* and Mariality*, most recently the production for children called Snipp Snapp Snabel* (2007). Further she has published 16 books for children and adults, and six CDs, and she has taken part in several movies and TV series. In 2001 she was the recipient of the honorary award of Leif Juster."

    *Maris glade Mariritt and Mariality are both creative wordplays on Mari Maurstad's first name in combination with familiar expressions. They can best be translated into Mari's merry nightmare (or nightmari), and Mari's reality, drawn into one word and simplified, mariality. Snipp Snapp are the first two words in the traditional fairytale ending, but Maurstad has replaced the third (Snute) with Snabel, the Norwegian term for an elephant's trunk.

Winners

  • Singin' in the Rain

    "For more than 30 years she has been an important part not just of Norwegian theatre, but of Norwegian culture. She has interpreted classic female roles, but she has also entertained a large audience with elegant efforts in revues and musicals. She has made solo shows, for children as well as adults, she has released books and CDs, and taken part in movies. She gets the award for a splendid character composition in which she ruthlessly self-depreciating, with sharp wit and human pathos describes a middle-aged woman in the marketplace of vanity.

    The best supporting actress award goes to Mari Maurstad for the role of Miss Lamont in Singin' in the rain at Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre) the spring of 2008."

  • Mari Maurstad

    "For more than 30 years she has been an important part not just of Norwegian theatre, but of Norwegian culture. She has interpreted classic female roles, but she has also entertained a large audience with elegant efforts in revues and musicals. She has made solo shows, for children as well as adults, she has released books and CDs, and taken part in movies. She gets the award for a splendid character composition in which she ruthlessly self-depreciating, with sharp wit and human pathos describes a middle-aged woman in the marketplace of vanity.

    The best supporting actress award goes to Mari Maurstad for the role of Miss Lamont in Singin' in the rain at Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre) the spring of 2008."

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    Debut of the year

    Nominees are not announced. The criteria are open.

    Winners

    • Worthless Men

      "Only in the world of theatre can this year's winner be said to be a newcomer. In at least two other areas he is an experienced artist enjoying great acclaim. This spring he made his debut with a theatre text writing a way out of the traditional theatre mindset, something as rare as an anti-drama text. There are situations, but no action and hardly any progress. In return there is a description of an environment so realistic it almost becomes mythical, and strong, desperate characters described without sentimentality, but also without superficial irony.

      The debut of the year award goes to Christopher Nielsen for the text of Worthless Men at The National Theatre/The Torshov Theatre the spring of 2007."

    • Christopher Nielsen

      "Only in the world of theatre can this year's winner be said to be a newcomer. In at least two other areas he is an experienced artist enjoying great acclaim. This spring he made his debut with a theatre text writing a way out of the traditional theatre mindset, something as rare as an anti-drama text. There are situations, but no action and hardly any progress. In return there is a description of an environment so realistic it almost becomes mythical, and strong, desperate characters described without sentimentality, but also without superficial irony.

      The debut of the year award goes to Christopher Nielsen for the text of Worthless Men at The National Theatre/The Torshov Theatre the spring of 2007."

    Best supporting actor

    The select excellent performance is to surpass other good performances through:

    *qualities of craft

    *artistic qualities

    *unpredictability

    The Hedda Awards 2008 were given out August 17 during a ceremony at Rogaland Theatre in Stavanger.

    The jury consisted of Thoralf Berg, IdaLou Larsen, Astrid Sletbakk, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Kristian Lykkeslet Strømskag.

    Nominations

    • Christian Greger Strøm

      Christian Greger Strøm for the role of Leone in Volpone by Ben Jonson, directed by Runar Hodne, The National Theatre, The Torshov Theatre:

      "Christian Greger Strøm was educated in England, at the drama study of Arts Educational Schools in London. He has worked with The Cherub Company in London, and at several Norwegian theatres: Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre), The Norwegian Touring Theatre, Haugesund Theatre, Teatret Vårt (Our Theatre) and Kruttårnteatret in Stavern. At The National Theatre his first major role was as the barber in When the Robbers Came to Cardamom Town. Since then he has played a lieutenant in Erasmus Montanus (2007), the evil count in Journey to the Christmas Star (2007) and a full-time human being in On the Open Road (2007). He also has had parts in several movie and TV productions, including the fiction film Miracle, directed by Thomas Kaiser."

    • Morten Espeland

      Morten Espeland for the role of Peter Karpati in Arabian Night by Roland Schimmelpfennig, directed by Jon Tombre, The Norwegian Theatre:

      "Morten Espeland graduated from The National Academy of Theatre in 1998, and made his debut as Peter in The Diary of Anne Frank (directed by Olof Lindquist) at The National Stage. At the same theatre he was nominated for The Hedda Award in the category of excellent performance for his interpretation of the boy in The Hour of the Lynx while director Aleksander Mørk-Eidem was nominated in the category of best direction for the same production. He came to The Norwegian Theatre in 1999, and there he has interpreted a number of major roles, such as the boy in Beautiful (2001), the title role of Dustefjerten* (The Dork Fart) (2003), Medvedenko in The Seagull by Chekhov (2003) and Bramati in Tord Akerbæk's Bima and Bramati (2003), the ugly child in Peer Gynt (2005), the title role in Rambuku, (2006), Bidger in Verdas mest forelska par* (The Couple in the World Who is the Most in Love, 2006), and the spring of 2008 Cyril and Inocent (in Yvonne, Princess of Burgundy, Sceneweb's comment)."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    • Petter Width Kristiansen

      Petter Width Kristiansen for the role of Lopakhin in The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov, directed by Yngve Sundvor, The National Stage:

      "Petter Width Kristiansen graduated from The National Academy of Theatre in 1999, and made his debut at Ibsen Theatre. In 2001 he was hired by The National Stage, where he in 2001 acted in The Metamorphosis and Evil, in 2002 in The Just AKA The Just Assassins, in Cleansed, and in the production for families called Dumme konger og grimme troll* (Stupid Kings and Ugly Trolls). In 2003 he had parts in Baal and One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest, while he in 2004 acted in The Wild Duck and The Pillowman. In 2005 he visited The Torshov Theatre in Jo Strømgren's 3:8 Limbo, and Rogaland Theatre where he played the role of landowner Ulfheim in When We Dead Awaken. Back in Bergen he had the role of the engineer Borgheim in Little Eyolf, and then the role of the dog Samson in Samson & Roberto. Until June this year he worked for the theatre in Kabul in a collaboration project between The National Stage and The National Theatre of Afghanistan, supported by The Peace Corps."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    Winners

    • Arabian Night

      "Excellent ensemble acting all over, a number of strong actors' performances. But then there was one particular interpretation to remember, nearly becoming a symbol of the whole performance. And not a leading role, a supporting role, simply. So it is with the winner of the year, who with exuberant with and humour, an exquisite ability to convey his lines in pair with precise body language and live use of facial expressions, managed to break down the divide between imagination and reality, in a superior game with the theatrical illusion.

      The best supporting actor award goes to Morten Espeland for the role of Peter Karpati - alias the man in the cognac bottle - in Arabian Night the autumn of 2007 at The Norwegian Theatre."

    • Morten Espeland

      "Excellent ensemble acting all over, a number of strong actors' performances. But then there was one particular interpretation to remember, nearly becoming a symbol of the whole performance. And not a leading role, a supporting role, simply. So it is with the winner of the year, who with exuberant with and humour, an exquisite ability to convey his lines in pair with precise body language and live use of facial expressions, managed to break down the divide between imagination and reality, in a superior game with the theatrical illusion.

      The best supporting actor award goes to Morten Espeland for the role of Peter Karpati - alias the man in the cognac bottle - in Arabian Night the autumn of 2007 at The Norwegian Theatre."

    Best leading actress

    The select excellent performance is to surpass other good performances through:

    *qualities of craft

    *artistic qualities

    *unpredictability

    The Hedda Awards 2008 were given out August 17 during a ceremony at Rogaland Theatre in Stavanger.

    The jury consisted of Thoralf Berg, IdaLou Larsen, Astrid Sletbakk, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Kristian Lykkeslet Strømskag.

    Nominations

    • Heidi Gjermundsen Broch

      Heidi Gjermundsen Broch for the role of An-Magritt in An-Magritt by Edvard Normann Rønning, music by Henning Sommerro after Johan Falkberget's novel cycle The Bread of Night AKA Nightly Bread, directed by Hilde Andersen, The Norwegian Theatre:

      "Aged twenty Heidi Gjermundsen Broch started studying at Paul McCartney's Liverpool Institute of Performing Arts. She studied music and song until she in 1997 was accepted at The National Academy of Theatre. After graduating, she started working for The Norwegian Theatre, where she has been employed since, except for when she in 2003 had the role of Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady at Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre). As an actress she has played the girl in Jon Fosse's Beautiful as well as the queen in Shakespeare's Richard II, while she as a singer has interpreted Klara Fine in The Emperor of Portugalia, the title role in An-Magritt and last, but not least, the chanteuse Edith Piaf in the musical Piaf."

    • Grethe Nordberg

      Grethe Nordberg for the role of Gina in The Wild Duck by Henrik Ibsen, directed by Anne-Karen Hytten, Trøndelag Theatre:

      "Grethe Nordberg graduated from The National Academy of Theatre in 1997, after which she came directly to Trøndelag Theatre. She took leave from the ensemble in 2004, but returned last autumn as Gina in The Wild Duck. She made her debut in the role of Cecilie in Petter Rosenlund's first play, An impossible boy, with its world wide premiere at Trøndelag Theatre, and has later played Laura in The Glass Menagerie, but also Josefine in Boer Boerson Jr., the young drug addict Lisa in Nina Valsø's Unbidden Guest, Bjørg in Jesper Halle's The Littlewoods, and Edith Piaf in Piaf. She also has experience as a director: The autumn of 2004 she instructed a youth theatre project in collaboration with NTNU, And the winner is."

    • Kjersti Botn Sandal

      Kjersti Sandal for the role of Anna in Carl and Anna by Leonhard Frank, directed by Oleg Kulikov, Rogaland Theatre:

      "Kjersti Sandal graduated from The National Academy of Theatre in 2001, and made her debut at The National Stage the same year in An Enemy of the People by Henrik Ibsen. At The National Stage she has interpreted classical roles such as in A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare, Hedvig in The Wild Duck and Solveig in Robert Wilson's Peer Gynt, but also Grace in Dogville and The Girl in Jon Fosse's The Girl on the Sofa. At Rogaland Theatre she took part in Anna Karenina the spring of 2007, and last autumn she played the title role in Carl and Anna. Later the same autumn she participated in The National Stage's collaboration project with the theatre in Kabul. The spring of 2008 she went to Tromsø to play Mrs. Linde in A Doll's House1 and 2."

    Winners

    • Carl and Anna

      "This year's young winner already has worked for three theatres, and she is a gifted, versatile actress who takes different challenges in stride. She gets the award for her presentation of a young woman who slowly, almost against her will, rediscovers the femininity and joy of life she had been forced to suppress. She interprets the role quietly, but with trembling intensity, enthrals with her wise use of lines, her telling body language and her full involvement. This is the kind of stage performance it's hard to forget.

      The best leading actress award goes to Kjersti Sandal for her moving interpretation of Anna in Carl and Anna by Leonhard Frank at Rogaland Theatre the autumn of 2007."

    • Kjersti Botn Sandal

      "This year's young winner already has worked for three theatres, and she is a gifted, versatile actress who takes different challenges in stride. She gets the award for her presentation of a young woman who slowly, almost against her will, rediscovers the femininity and joy of life she had been forced to suppress. She interprets the role quietly, but with trembling intensity, enthrals with her wise use of lines, her telling body language and her full involvement. This is the kind of stage performance it's hard to forget.

      The best leading actress award goes to Kjersti Sandal for her moving interpretation of Anna in Carl and Anna by Leonhard Frank at Rogaland Theatre the autumn of 2007."

    Best leading actor

    The select excellent performance is to surpass other good performances through:

    *qualities of craft

    *artistic qualities

    *unpredictability

    The Hedda Awards 2008 were given out August 17 during a ceremony at Rogaland Theatre in Stavanger.

    The jury consisted of Thoralf Berg, IdaLou Larsen, Astrid Sletbakk, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Kristian Lykkeslet Strømskag.

    Nominations

    • Anders Baasmo Christiansen

      Anders Baasmo Christiansen for the role of Hamlet in Hamlet by William Shakespeare, directed by Yngve Sundvor, The Norwegian Touring Theatre:

      "Anders Baasmo Christiansen was accepted as a student at The National Academy of Theatrein 1997, and in 2000 he started his acting career at Trøndelag Theatre where he as early as 2001 became the recipient of the theatre friend association award called Teatrets Venners Kunstneriske pris for his interpretation of Mozart in Peter Shaffer's Amadeus. This he also got the newspaper Adresseavisen's award Årets scenegjennombrudd (literally: The stage breakthrough of the year) for. In 2002 he came to The Norwegian Theatre where he among many other roles in 2006 played Christopher Mahon in The Playboy of the Western World Helten på den grøne øya. In 2003 he was the King in the traditional The Saint Olav Drama in Stiklestad, and Petter Dass in Herr Petters Lovsang* (The Psalm Tribute of Master Petter) during Nordland Music Festival. He has also been a movie actor, and in 2004 he received The Amanda Award as best actor for his role in Buddy, and in 2007 he got the TV award Gullruten as best actor for the role of Henrik Ibsen in Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation's An Immortal Man."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    • Gard B. Eidsvold

      Gard B. Eidsvold for the role of Kleggen in Worthless Men by Christopher Nielsen, directed by Anders T. Andersen, The National Theatre/The Torshov Theatre:

      "Gard B. Eidsvold is an actor and instructor. In 1995 he initiated establishing Oslo Moderne Teater (Oslo Modern Theatre), meant to be an alternative to the institutions, but winning its first major success with Hunger, a collaboration project with The National Theatre. At The National Theatre Gard B. Eidsvold has played Hjalmar Ekdal in The Wild Duck (2004), Sigurd Ibsen in Henrik and Emilie, and Doctor Rank in Cold Product, now to visit the theatre biennial in Wiesbaden. He has also acted in a number of movies, The Woman of My Life, Kitchen Stories, Blessed Are Those Who Thirst and Zero Kelvin to mention just a few."

    • Cato Skimten Storengen

      Cato Skimten Storengen for the role of Frank N. Furter in The Rocky Horror Show, directed by Kim Sørensen, Nordland Theatre:

      "Cato Skimten Storengen started his career as an amateur actor and director in his home village Hedalen in Valdres, and he chose to specialise in music, dance and drama in upper secondary school. In 2000 he was accepted at The National Academy of Theatre and in 2004 he made his debut at Rogaland Theatre in the role of T. Steadman Harder in A Moon for the Misbegotten. At Rogaland Theatre he took part in the grand project Nicholas Nickleby, and he played Don José in Dutch Oscar van Woensel's Carmen in 2005. He also took part in Richard III, White Nights, Tape, Skyfri himmel* (Cloud-free Sky) and Journey to the Christmas Star before he the autumn of 2007 went on leave from the theatre to play Frank N. Furter in The Rocky Horror Show at Nordland Theatre."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    Winners

    • Hamlet

      "The winner of the year is a young actor who has not only made his mark on the theatre stage, but also on the movie screen. He has already won several prestigious awards, and he gets The Hedda Award for his interpretation of one of the theatre's great classic heroes.He brings us along on a modern journey into the mind of a young man who suddenly experiences that his world breaks down. Far from external theatricality, with deep understanding of the text, and with the energy and power we have learned to know him through, he manages to overwhelm us with new contemporaneity in the familiar lines.

      The best leading actor award goes to Anders Baasmo Christiansen because he at The Norwegian Touring Theatre the autumn of 2007 created a Hamlet of today."

    • Anders Baasmo Christiansen

      "The winner of the year is a young actor who has not only made his mark on the theatre stage, but also on the movie screen. He has already won several prestigious awards, and he gets The Hedda Award for his interpretation of one of the theatre's great classic heroes.He brings us along on a modern journey into the mind of a young man who suddenly experiences that his world breaks down. Far from external theatricality, with deep understanding of the text, and with the energy and power we have learned to know him through, he manages to overwhelm us with new contemporaneity in the familiar lines.

      The best leading actor award goes to Anders Baasmo Christiansen because he at The Norwegian Touring Theatre the autumn of 2007 created a Hamlet of today."

    Best direction

    Best direction is to surpass other good directions through:

    *choice of style and/or style elements and how this/these are executed and adjusted to the totality of the production

    *how style and/or style elements are adjusted to and established in relation to the material the production discusses or is based on (the dramaturgy/reading)

    *innovation in style

    The Hedda Awards 2008 were given out August 17 during a ceremony at Rogaland Theatre in Stavanger.

    The jury consisted of Thoralf Berg, IdaLou Larsen, Astrid Sletbakk, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Kristian Lykkeslet Strømskag

    Nominations

    • Melanie Mederlind

      Melanie Mederlind for Ulrike Maria Stuart by Elfriede Jelinek, The National Theatre:

      "Melanie Mederlind was educated at Stockholm Academy of Dramatic Arts (SADA), graduating in 2004. She had already, in the beginning of the 1990es, gone through education as an actress at the School of Theatre and Cinema in Portugal, and for three years she was employed as an actress at Teatro Nacional in Lisbon and Teatro da Cornucópia. Next she returned to Sweden, and in 1999 and 2000 she worked as a dramaturge and a director's assistant at Malmö City Theatre, where she directed her first play by Elfriede Jelinek, The Farewell AKA Goodbye. For Swedish Riksteatern her direction credits include Elfriede Jelinek's In The Alps and Sarah Kane's 4:48 Psychosis, the latter of which also visited The Norwegian Touring Theatre and The Contemporary Stage Festival (2005). She has staged other German-language playwrights as well, including Peter Handke's Self-Accusation, and Jail Bait by Franz Xaver Kroetz was her diploma assignment. She also has translated plays by Strindberg, Dagerman and Norén into Portuguese, and in 2004 she received a cultural grant from the Skåne region."

    • Jon Tombre

      Jon Tombre for Arabian Night by Roland Schimmelpfennig, The Norwegian Theatre:

      "Jon Tombre has his background from L'École Internationale de Théâtre Jacques Lecoq in Paris. He is one of the utterly few directors who have been able to work inside as well as outside the theatre institutions. In 1990 he started Det Motsatte Prosjekt to promote new performing arts, in 1991 he was accepted as a student at the direction study of The National Academy of Theatre, and in 1998 he became the very first performing arts consultant of Arts Council Norway. He has emphasised new drama: He has staged Niels Fredrik Dahl's Ordinary Red Wine (Det Motsatte Prosjekt, 1995), David Harrower's Knives in Hens (The Norwegian Theatre, 1997), Cecilie Løveid's Austria (The National Theatre 1998), Jon Fosse's Winter (Beaivváš 2005), Jesper Halle's The Littlewoods (2003), The Presnyakov Brothers's Terrorism (2005) and Frode Øien's Pepsilove (2006). But he has also directed Ibsen: Hedda Gabler for Hålogaland Theatre (1997), and Little Eyolf, part of Dannelsesreisen* (The Educational Journey), at Ibsen Theatre (2007)."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    • Anne-Karen Hytten

      Anne-Karen Hytten for The Wild Duck by Henrik Ibsen at Trøndelag Theatre:

      "Anne-Karen Hytten made her debut as a director almost 30 years ago, in 1980, and she has worked with most genres within performing arts: Norwegian classics such as The Wild Duck, When We Dead Awaken and The Master Builder, modern American drama such as Eugene O’Neill's A Moon for the Misbegotten (at The National Theatre and Rogaland Theatre), modern texts such as Harold Pinter's Betrayal (Rogaland Theatre 2006), theatre for children such as The Animals in the Hunchback Wood (The National Theatre), but also Barske Glæder's Emilie and the Wild Mother. She has been central within the puppetry division of Oslo Nye Teater (Oslo New Theatre), and she was the director behind one of The National Theatre's greatest successes, Lilli Valentine, with its Norwegian premiere in 1989, most recently performed at the amphi stage (Amfiscenen) in 2001. She has written, dramatised, translated and processed, and she has worked for most of the venues in Norway."

    Winners

    • The Wild Duck

      "The winner of the year has long experience from Norwegian theatre, making her debut as a director almost 30 years ago. The winner also has written, processed, translated and dramatised theatre texts for children and adults. In this age of director's theatre - not to put that down! - this year's production is the best proof that classics can be renewed and reinterpreted entirely without spectacular outer effects: A director who with her heart and brain listens to the playwright, emphasises the original text and knows how to convey her insight to the actors. More than that it doesn't take.

      The direction award of the year goes to Anne-Karen Hytten for her glowing, feminine new reading of Ibsen's The Wild Duck at Trøndelag Theatre the autumn of 2007."

    • Anne-Karen Hytten

      "The winner of the year has long experience from Norwegian theatre, making her debut as a director almost 30 years ago. The winner also has written, processed, translated and dramatised theatre texts for children and adults. In this age of director's theatre - not to put that down! - this year's production is the best proof that classics can be renewed and reinterpreted entirely without spectacular outer effects: A director who with her heart and brain listens to the playwright, emphasises the original text and knows how to convey her insight to the actors. More than that it doesn't take.

      The direction award of the year goes to Anne-Karen Hytten for her glowing, feminine new reading of Ibsen's The Wild Duck at Trøndelag Theatre the autumn of 2007."

    Theatre project of the year

    The theatre project of the year is to surpass other projects through:

    *current interest

    *format

    *context

    *event

    The Hedda Awards 2008 were given out August 17 during a ceremony at Rogaland Theatre in Stavanger.

    The jury consisted of Thoralf Berg, IdaLou Larsen, Astrid Sletbakk, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Kristian Lykkeslet Strømskag

    Nominations

    • Worthless Men

      Worthless Men by Christopher Nielsen, directed by Anders T. Andersen, The National Theatre, The Torshov Theatre:

      "Worthless Men is an Oslo musical of the sincere kind. Honest, madcap, funny and sad."

      Dagbladet

      "Nearing a symbiosis of Christopher Nielsen's raw cartoon humour and his late brother Joachim's candid rock reports from Purgatory on Earth."

      Aftenposten

      "Worthless Men on the theatre stage is genius... To play a bunch of drug addicts in such a disturbing credible way is an accomplishment."

      Morgenbladet

    • Himmelske lyster* (Divine Desires)

      Himmelske lyster* (Divine Desires) by Terje Nordby, directed by Lennart Lidström, Hedmark Theatre:

      "This play is simply medicine for body and soul, and something everyone will get a lot out of seeing."

      Oppland Arbeiderblad

      "Himmelske lyster will delight the people of Hedmark and draw packed-full houses!"

      Østlendingen

      "Hedmark Theatre celebrates its jubilee with a fabulously funny popular comedy in which Greek myths, local humour and surefire society satire merge."

      Klassekampen

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    • Man Equals Man

      Man Equals Man by Bertolt Brecht, directed by Tore Vagn Lid, Rogaland Theatre:

      "Honour to the brave souls in Stavanger, daring this."

      VG

      "A welcome break from the absolute pandering to the audience. (..) The Brecht classic is a funny-sad and at the same time pretty tragic game with the great questions of life. (…) deep and superficial in the same way. Brecht plays with us, entirely seriously."

      Stavanger Aftenblad

      "In Man Equals Man desperate pessimism, cynical irony, grotesque gallows humour, bitter misanthropy and the sense of doom still rule. (..) Still it has become an interesting, involving production, with its mix of raw reportage, surrealism, baroque paradoxes in style and content, ambiguous irony, playful breaks with illusion and confusing style."

      Bergens Tidende

    Winners

    • Tore Vagn Lid/Transiteatret Bergen

      "The production of the year, obviously, is to be of high artistic quality. But the project is also to be an event in its own effect. It is to be of current interest, and to be expressed originally. The production of the year satisfies all these demands, and the director has managed to unite the classic professionalism of the theatre institutions with the independent companies' modernity and innovation. The result is a virtuoso stage game in which an exuberantly comical sound image, an imagination-triggering installation, excellent use of video and powerful acting join forces in shaking to pieces the classic theatre's illusion of reality.

      The theatre project of the year is Man Equals Man, a collaboration project between Rogaland Theatre and Transiteatret, directed by Tore Vagn Lid."

    • Rogaland Theatre

      "The production of the year, obviously, is to be of high artistic quality. But the project is also to be an event in its own effect. It is to be of current interest, and to be expressed originally. The production of the year satisfies all these demands, and the director has managed to unite the classic professionalism of the theatre institutions with the independent companies' modernity and innovation. The result is a virtuoso stage game in which an exuberantly comical sound image, an imagination-triggering installation, excellent use of video and powerful acting join forces in shaking to pieces the classic theatre's illusion of reality.

      The theatre project of the year is Man Equals Man, a collaboration project between Rogaland Theatre and Transiteatret, directed by Tore Vagn Lid."

    • Man Equals Man

      "The production of the year, obviously, is to be of high artistic quality. But the project is also to be an event in its own effect. It is to be of current interest, and to be expressed originally. The production of the year satisfies all these demands, and the director has managed to unite the classic professionalism of the theatre institutions with the independent companies' modernity and innovation. The result is a virtuoso stage game in which an exuberantly comical sound image, an imagination-triggering installation, excellent use of video and powerful acting join forces in shaking to pieces the classic theatre's illusion of reality.

      The theatre project of the year is Man Equals Man, a collaboration project between Rogaland Theatre and Transiteatret, directed by Tore Vagn Lid."

    • Tore Vagn Lid

      "The production of the year, obviously, is to be of high artistic quality. But the project is also to be an event in its own effect. It is to be of current interest, and to be expressed originally. The production of the year satisfies all these demands, and the director has managed to unite the classic professionalism of the theatre institutions with the independent companies' modernity and innovation. The result is a virtuoso stage game in which an exuberantly comical sound image, an imagination-triggering installation, excellent use of video and powerful acting join forces in shaking to pieces the classic theatre's illusion of reality.

      The theatre project of the year is Man Equals Man, a collaboration project between Rogaland Theatre and Transiteatret, directed by Tore Vagn Lid."

    Best visual design

    Best stage/costume/light design is to surpass other good works through:

    *conceptuel autonomy (the design being a work in itself) balanced with conceptual function (the dramaturgic dispositions of the space)

    *relation to related artistic expressions (visual art, design, architecture)

    *innovation, in relation to the profession of stage design/theatre and in relation to related artistic expression

    The Hedda Awards 2008 were given out August 17 during a ceremony at Rogaland Theatre in Stavanger.

    The jury consisted of Thoralf Berg, IdaLou Larsen, Astrid Sletbakk, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Kristian Lykkeslet Strømskag

    Nominations

    • Per Kristian Solbakken

      Per Kristian Solbakken for the stage design for A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, Trøndelag Theatre:

      "Per Kristian Solbakken came to Trøndelag Theatre as a prop master, but soon started his real career as a stage designer in 1981, with Golden Leaf Strut by Julian Garner. As opposed to most stage designers, who tend to prefer freelance careers, he has been steadily employed by Trøndelag Theatre since then, even though he, naturally, has had some assignments at other theatres, too. Among his more recent stage designs one can mention Berlin Poplars (2006), Norge Midt-Norge* (Norway Middle-Norway, homophone for Norway, My Norway, Sceneweb's comment) (2005) and 24 Unsuccessful Norwegians (2003). In 1998 he was nominated for The Hedda Award for An impossible boy by Petter S. Rosenlund."

      *Not yet translated into English. The title within parentheses is the Norwegian title's literal meaning.

    • Ingrid Tønder

      Ingrid Tønder for the lighting, costume and stage design for Arabian Night by Roland Schimmelpfennig, The Norwegian Theatre:

      "Ingrid Tønder was born in 1972, and educated as a lighting designer at Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London. Since then she has had assignments at most of the major theatres in Norway, but she has also worked for independent companies. In 1998, for instance, she did the lighting design for !Bang's Play Stndrg, opening at Black Box Teater in Oslo, but she has also been responsible for the lighting design for productions like Faith, Hope and Charity (2001), Maria Stuart (2004, both at The National Theatre) and for The Master Builder (2003), a collaboration project between The Norwegian Touring Theatre and The National Theatre. At The Norwegian Theatre she has, among other things, been responsible for the lighting for Duck Hunting in 2002, and for Frank and The Slope in 2005, an effort for which she was also nominated for The Hedda Award."

    • Kari Gravklev

      Kari Gravklev for the stage design for I Am the Wind, The National Theatre:

      "Kari Gravklev started her career at Hålogaland Theatre, where she was steadily employed from 1973 to 1979. She hadn't been in Tromsø for long before she became sought-after by other theatre instructors, and today she is among our best known, most renowned and used stage designers. She has had assignments with nearly all the Norwegian theatre institutions, but also for an independent company such as The Theatre of Cruelty, and for movies and TV. Not to mention the opening ceremony during the Lillehammer Olympics. In 2003 she got The Hedda Award in the category of best visual design for the stage design for The Song of the Say-Sayer at The Norwegian Theatre."

    Winners

    • Arabian Night

      "A fruitful and inspiring collaboration is key to a successful performance. Naturally the playwright as well as the director and the actors share the honour of making this very production such a unique and fascinating one, and they too deserve recognition. But The Hedda Jury has chosen to give an award to the artist who, with a bubbling source of imagination, targeted precision and plenty of humour transformed a dead boring modern high-rise into an endlessly magical universe in which everything could and did happen.

      The award goes to Ingrid Tønder for the visual concept to Arabian Night at The Norwegian Theatre the autumn of 2007."

    • Ingrid Tønder

      "A fruitful and inspiring collaboration is key to a successful performance. Naturally the playwright as well as the director and the actors share the honour of making this very production such a unique and fascinating one, and they too deserve recognition. But The Hedda Jury has chosen to give an award to the artist who, with a bubbling source of imagination, targeted precision and plenty of humour transformed a dead boring modern high-rise into an endlessly magical universe in which everything could and did happen.

      The award goes to Ingrid Tønder for the visual concept to Arabian Night at The Norwegian Theatre the autumn of 2007."

    Best production for children and youth

    The best production for children and youth is to surpass other productions for children and youth in:

    *quality based on the character of theatre, in choice of style elements and dramaturgy

    *communication with the target group

    *choice of material

    The Hedda Awards 2008 were given out August 17 during a ceremony at Rogaland Theatre in Stavanger.

    The jury consisted of Thoralf Berg, IdaLou Larsen, Astrid Sletbakk, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Kristian Lykkeslet Strømskag

    Nominations

    • Polyphonia - Or born against better judgement

      Polyphonia by Tore Vagn Lid, Transiteatret:

      "Why are young people bored in the theatre, Tore Vagn Lid wondered. The question resulted in the production Polyphonia. An experiment, Lid says. Successful, we say."

      VG

      "Transiteatret has taken youth so seriously they have not assembled a tame theatre production. They have also given their audience a spry piece of theatre and a demanding message to keep chewing on. The production is in the crossfire between this fragile, vulnerable landscape the young people are emotionally in, and the rough reality they have to relate to, at school and their time off."

      Bergens Tidende

    • Hibernation

      Hibernation at Teatret Vårt (Our Theatre):

      "...running fun for the audience. As if we used a negative looking glass in having a look at ourselves, multiplied with a hundred. For is it so that parents frantically want their kids to stay small? Are the children there for the parents to have someone to reflect their success through? Are all everyday ritual of the good, and should meals be used as punishment? Is it right to treat children like this?"

      Romsdals Budstikke

      "Finally - different theatre for children! A funny, witty as well as beautiful production which - to use a worn-out expression, finally getting its due - takes the children seriously."

      www.idalou.no

    • A Christmas Carol

      A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens at Trøndelag Theatre:

      "The production of A Christmas Carol is both scary and fun, and may give a tiny little anti-materialist pause to the pre-Christmas time."

      Adresseavisen

      "Trøndelag Theatre gives the audience a fabulous pre-Christmas gift with the production of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol. During the performance we go through full emotional range. We shudder, laugh and cry to eventually end with the entirely good feeling."

      Sør-Trøndelag

    Winners

    • Teatret Vårt (Our Theatre)

      "In the whole wide world a lot of new and exciting drama for children is written, and performed. But the theatre institutions at home don't pay attention, and prefer to offer new productions of the evergreen children classics of Egner and Lindgren. The bigger the pleasure that one of our theatres brazenly and bravely and with excellent artistic results has made newly written drama for children a priority. The award winner is unusual: A funny, witty and beautiful performance using original, charming and efficient effects to express something that is substantial and significant for the age group it addresses.

      The winner is Hibernation by Dutch Heleen Verburg at Teatret Vårt (Our Theatre) the spring of 2007."

    • Hibernation

      "In the whole wide world a lot of new and exciting drama for children is written, and performed. But the theatre institutions at home don't pay attention, and prefer to offer new productions of the evergreen children classics of Egner and Lindgren. The bigger the pleasure that one of our theatres brazenly and bravely and with excellent artistic results has made newly written drama for children a priority. The award winner is unusual: A funny, witty and beautiful performance using original, charming and efficient effects to express something that is substantial and significant for the age group it addresses.

      The winner is Hibernation by Dutch Heleen Verburg at Teatret Vårt (Our Theatre) the spring of 2007."

    Special artistic achievement

    The criteria are open. In this category the jury announces no nominees.

    The Hedda Awards 2008 were given out August 17 during a ceremony at Rogaland Theatre in Stavanger.

    The jury consisted of Thoralf Berg, IdaLou Larsen, Astrid Sletbakk, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Kristian Lykkeslet Strømskag.

    Winners

    • @lice

      "Despite many good, solid artistic efforts, all in all the theatre season 2007/2008 has been a regular season. But the year is also characterised by different productions telling of renewal of Norwegian theatre. This year's winner is a capable representative of the new direction. He has given a convincing, visual presentation of love incyberspace, and managed to create stage design triggering the imagination, while not settling with merging with the dance, it also wanted to promote it.

      Tormod Lindgren gets the special artistic achievement award for his (literally) illuminating stage design for @lice, an innovative collaboration project by The Norwegian Touring Theatre and Concerts Norway."

    • Tormod Lindgren

      "Despite many good, solid artistic efforts, all in all the theatre season 2007/2008 has been a regular season. But the year is also characterised by different productions telling of renewal of Norwegian theatre. This year's winner is a capable representative of the new direction. He has given a convincing, visual presentation of love incyberspace, and managed to create stage design triggering the imagination, while not settling with merging with the dance, it also wanted to promote it.

      Tormod Lindgren gets the special artistic achievement award for his (literally) illuminating stage design for @lice, an innovative collaboration project by The Norwegian Touring Theatre and Concerts Norway."

    Honorary Hedda

    The Hedda Awards 2008 were given out August 17 during a ceremony at Rogaland Theatre in Stavanger.

    The jury consisted of Thoralf Berg, IdaLou Larsen, Astrid Sletbakk, Anne Cath Sommerfeldt and Kristian Lykkeslet Strømskag.

    Winners

    • The Children and Youth Theatre at Rogaland Theatre

      "The Honorary Hedda is not supposed to be an annual event, but is only to be awarded when the jury can't not give it out. Wenche Foss got it in 2002, Jon Fosse in 2003, Espen Skjønberg and Toralv Maurstad in 2005. This year the jury couldn't abstain from giving out again.

      The theatre offering to children and youth unfortunately is a neglected area in our rich theatre country. But there is one amazing exception. And that is here, in Stavanger, where the Honorary Award winner has provided children and youth with love to the theatre for almost 30 years, and educated, not just a number of performing artists who have enriched Norwegian theatre, but also a unique audience.

      The Honorary Award goes to Elsa Nordvang, leader of The Children and Youth Theatre at Rogaland Theatre from 1973 to 2002."

    • Elsa Nordvang

      "The Honorary Hedda is not supposed to be an annual event, but is only to be awarded when the jury can't not give it out. Wenche Foss got it in 2002, Jon Fosse in 2003, Espen Skjønberg and Toralv Maurstad in 2005. This year the jury couldn't abstain from giving out again.

      The theatre offering to children and youth unfortunately is a neglected area in our rich theatre country. But there is one amazing exception. And that is here, in Stavanger, where the Honorary Award winner has provided children and youth with love to the theatre for almost 30 years, and educated, not just a number of performing artists who have enriched Norwegian theatre, but also a unique audience.

      The Honorary Award goes to Elsa Nordvang, leader of The Children and Youth Theatre at Rogaland Theatre from 1973 to 2002."